Tag » street harassment
There is no way around it – the holiday season has arrived. Lampposts have been adorned with wreaths and sparkling lights, Christmas songs have infected the radio waves, and you are stuck wondering what gift to get your Aunt Melanie this year. Well, if your Aunt Melanie is someone who’s exhausted not just by walking the streets to buy presents but by the street harassment that often comes with it, and if she’s into DIY projects – we’ve got an idea. Read More
Street harassment reversal videos are killing the viral video market, and Miss Eaves is on trend.  If you’re not already a fan of her subject-specific raps, the time is now. Certainly her 2012 series (NPR, Snuggies) was clever, clip-art graphics and all. But her new single “Aye Girl” is pretty fucking cute. Charming Brooklyn gals turn the tables on a squeamish P. Kilmure (also the producer). As for Miss Eaves? Her song is pretty seamless, with beauties such as, “Jerk it pervert, it’s not gonna work.” And her avocado earrings close the deal. Read More
CNN anchor Fredricka Whitfield was joined by comedian Amanda Seales and writer Steven Santagati to respond to last week’s viral cat catcalling video. Santagati, author of The Manual: A True Bad Boy Explains How Men Think, Date, and Mate, is a self-proclaimed expert on the psychology of catcalling, so he offers gems like this: “I can’t get into a woman’s head … but I’m a guy and I know why these guys do this [...] There is nothing more that a woman loves to hear than how pretty she is. Read More
Since its release on Tuesday, the YouTube video, “10 hours of Walking in NYC as a Woman has over 16,000,000 views. Joining with filmmaker Robert Bliss, Hollaback!, an organization that aims to end street harassment, created the video in an effort to bring attention to the street harassment many women experience every day. "But what about men??" said the men who felt left out. Funny Or Die News decided to conduct an experiment to see what happens to a white man walking the streets of NYC. Read More
Living in a huge urban center like New York City means that catcalls and whistles, unwanted greetings and gestures, can, unfortunately, come at you any time of the day or night. Case in point: I left my bartending job at 1 pm IN THE AFTERNOON yesterday, after working an all-night rave that rendered me exhausted, voice-less and wanting to buy an apple from the corner fruit stand just to chuck it at a passing police siren. In other words, I looked rough. Read More