Tag » street art
  Our media bombards us with two polarized representations of acceptable and desirable female sexuality: the madonna and the whore. In his series DIRTYLAND, the artist Dillon Boy complicates these constructs, positioning what he calls “the pure, untainted characters of Walt Disney” within aesthetics associated with the contemporary objectification and hyper-sexualization of women on “billboards […] and ad[s] in […] publication[s]. Read More
With less than seven days left for Banksy’s New York City residency, titled “Better Out Than In,” the British street artist still has admirers and dissenters, more or less, on the edge of their seats, and NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg mostly frustrated. Each day in October has welcomed a new work on the streets of the Big Apple, varying from classic Banksy mischief to insightful mobile and kinetic works that could have easily been mislabeled as pranks to the uninformed. Read More
  “Cute” isn’t a word I’d use to describe most street art. It also isn’t a word I’d usually apply to feminist art. Both types of countercultural expression are about breaking down prejudices and confronting the public in ways that are moving and sometimes unsettling. My favorite work of feminist art that involves menstruation is Judy Chicago’s Red Flag, a photolithograph of a woman pulling out a tampon. The image is meant as an attack against the idea that women’s everyday activities can’t be the stuff of fine art. Read More
Multi-talented artist and fashion designer Claudia Gold is painting a mural for BUST tomorrow at our Ladies Represent! art show and we couldn’t be more stoked. Not only will she be showcasing her skills in action, but her work will be featured in our gallery itself! Gold got her start as CLAW Money, the legendary alter ego she created for her street artwork. The New Yorker has been creating vibrant, pop culture-inspired murals and designs since the ‘80s, so we’re honored to have her at our gallery show tomorrow at Superchief. Read More
When some gross dude on the street yells at you on the street, calling you “baby” or telling you you’re looking fine or some crap like that, it’s hard to think of a good response. (I usually awkwardly avoid eye contact and start powerwalking away.) Tatyana Fazlalizadeh has created art installations that say what we’re thinking when that shit happens. Fazlalizadeh is a prolific artist who has worked with several mediums, including oil painting, photography, illustration, and video. Read More