Tag » sexual harassment
Badass Twitter activist Mikki Kendall created the hashtag #FirstHarassed to open up the conversation about when women first begin to experience sexual harassment. Unsurprisingly, the phrase quickly went viral; also unsurprisingly, harassment starts early for most girls. Ugh.   The anecdotes that have been accumulating on Twitter are substantiated by recent research from Hollaback! and the organization's survey on street harassment — the biggest and most international one to date. Read More
The first few times Poppy Smart was catcalled by construction workers on her way to work in Worcester UK, she tried to ignore it: "I started wearing sunglasses so I didn't have to look at them. I started putting headphones on so I didn't have to hear them," she told BBC news. But, after a month of street harassment, she decided enough was enough, and reported the workers to the police.   Woah, the police?! That seems extreme, right? Wrong. Read More
In Lima, Peru, 7 out of 10 women are catcalled by men every day—but a new public service campaign is showing guys just how foolish they are for harassing women by way of the women who taught them the most: their mothers. The PSA, called “Silbale A Tu Madre” (Whistle At Your Mother), began when Everlast, the organization producing the campaign, spoke to the mothers of two men guilty of sexual harassment. These moms agreed to get dolled up in a disguise and then walk by their sons on the street. Read More
Living in a huge urban center like New York City means that catcalls and whistles, unwanted greetings and gestures, can, unfortunately, come at you any time of the day or night. Case in point: I left my bartending job at 1 pm IN THE AFTERNOON yesterday, after working an all-night rave that rendered me exhausted, voice-less and wanting to buy an apple from the corner fruit stand just to chuck it at a passing police siren. In other words, I looked rough. Read More
The YouTube community is at a loss with recent accusations of sexual assault directed towards popular “prankster,” Sam Pepper. This British vlogger has over 2 million subscribers on YouTube and over 1.1 million followers on Twitter. A majority of his fans are young women.  Personally, I’m shocked that he was able to gain a fan base on YouTube, considering his prank videos that involve violating women. His most recent video, which promoted the allegations from victims, was a video, “Fake Hand Ass Pinch Prank. Read More