Tag » sexism in the workplace
I have been wearing at least some form of makeup since I was eleven. Why? When I was eleven, it was mascara for my white-blonde eyelashes and concealer for my pimples. What about now? I don’t think I have a singular answer. I like the ritual of putting on makeup in the morning, I enjoy playing with eyeshadow and lip colors, and I genuinely think I look about 110 percent prettier with makeup on. I wear makeup because it makes me feel good. For me, it’s that simple, a reflex. Read More
After Coty Richardson, a professor at Northwest Christian University, announced her pregnancy last May, her employer responded not with congratulations but demands. To keep her job at this century-old private institution in Eugene, Oregon, the professor needed to either deem the pregnancy a mistake and part ways with the child’s father (also her boyfriend of twelve years), or marry him. Asking for privacy regarding her personal life, Richardson refused to comply. Read More
Women of the workplace, unite! Even your office building’s air conditioner is sexist, new research suggests. This week, two scientists (both male, thanks fellas!) published a study revealing the guidelines most office buildings use to set temperatures were created in the 60s, when women were largely absent from office environments. You know, because we weren’t wanted there and women aren’t fit for work outside the home, blah, blah. With only male employees, the “thermal comfort model” equation was formulated with male metabolic rates in mind. Read More
  Need a little pick-me-up this evening? Here’s a heartwarming tale of boys just bein’ boys! Professor emeritus Paula Nicolson, of Royal Holloway University, discusses in the Times Higher Education Supplement some of the struggles that women deal with in the workplace. One of those struggles? Sexism is used by men “as a bonding experience.” D’aww! Male bonding! Nicolson’s remarks follow the uproar in response to Tim Hunt’s comments about female scientists working alongside male scientists. Read More
In a new and wonderful trend of female actors speaking out about being paid less than their male co-stars, Amanda Seyfried has come forward. The actress revealed that she was paid ten percent of what a male co-star was on a big-budget Hollywood film a few years ago. (She didn’t specify which film it was—fans have speculated that it might be Les Miserables, In Time, or Dear John.) “I think people think that just because I’m easy-going and game to do things I’ll just take as little as they offer,” Seyfried says. Read More
Girl just can’t get a break. After tweeting about a totally sexist wardrobe note for Adam Sandler’s upcoming movie, Rose McGowan reports (via tweet) that her acting agent fired her for speaking out. In an interview with EW, McGowan said of the wardrobe note, “This is normal to so many people. It was probably even a girl that had to type it up. It’s institutionally okay… I’m not trying to vilify Adam Sandler.” The note was a painfully clear example of the casual, everyday sexism that goes on in Hollywood. Read More
Everyday sexism strikes again. On the Today show last week, Matt Lauer hosted an exclusive interview with General Motors CEO, Mary Barra.   The interview mainly covered the controversy over the late ignition switch recall, and if the interview stopped after those three minutes, it would have been great; however, Lauer asked two more questions that, by God, were so stereotypically sexist that I could not believe someone had not stopped him from going forward with them.  In the video above, Lauer asks the following two questions: 1. Read More
  Oh dear. Just when we thought we had covered all of the fields in which women are discriminated, we churned up another: air travel. In a study by English travel agent sunshine.co.uk, 51 percent of travelers expressed a preference for male pilots over females. Shockingly, it was mostly women who felt unsafe with lady pilots behind the wheel.    Not only did the study reveal prejudice, but it also aimed to explain why people feel this way. Read More
  According to the New York legal firm Clifford Chance, female lawyers and staffers need to tone down their feminine “quirks.” In a memo addressed only to female employees, the firm instructed women on everything from speech patterns to proper attire.    Much of the advice might be helpful to any young associate; for example, they advise “[projecting] power,” not using the word “like,” or “[dropping] your volume at the end of a sentence,” and not “[raising] your pitch at the end of a statement if it’s not a question. Read More
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