Tag » science
Living in close quarters with your lady friends has many benefits, but studies show that menstrual synchrony—synced-up periods triggered by pheromones—may not be one of them. In her seminal 1971 study, psychologist Martha McClintock concluded that synced cycles are related to the exchange of pheromones between women in close social contact.     Besties!   However, a whole crop of studies have popped up since then that contradict the “McClintock effect”—and some that claim to disprove the existence of pheromones as a whole. Read More
  Vanderbilt psychologists have recently found that women are better than men at recognizing living things, and men are better than women at recognizing vehicles. The psychologists didn’t set out to study sex differences: the discovery was the surprising result of an analysis of a series of visual recognition tasks collected in the process of developing a new standard test for expertise in object recognition. Read More
We’re loving these minimalist posters created by Hydrogene, posted on Flavorwire, dedicated to famous female scientists! First up is Jane Goodall, the British primatologist, anthropologist, and ethologist who’s known for her 45-year-long in-depth studies of chimps and her work with animal welfare and environmental conservation.     There’s also Grace Hopper, a famous computer scientist who worked on some of the world’s first computers.  She was also an Admiral in the U.S. Navy. Read More
Like the author of this article, I’m not really for testing on animals in the name of science.  However, some new testing from Washington State University and the University of California-Davis has determined some pretty scary stuff about Bisphenol A (or BPA), by feeding primates with it.  The study found that by giving doses of BPA that are the equivalent to what humans ingest, the reproductive systems of the primates were harmed, “causing chromosome damage, miscarriages, and birth defects,” according to the WSU website. Read More
    Periodically Inspired creates awesome designs inspired by the Periodic Table of Elements. Various elements 'bond' to create fun statements emblazoned on tees, mugs, and even iPhone skins.   Pick up a fun gift for the geeky guy, gal, or baby in your life at the BUST Magazine Craftacular at World Maker Faire! It's taking place at the New York Hall of Science, 47-01 111th Street, Queens, New York, this Saturday, September 29, from 10 AM - 7 PM, and Sunday, September 30, from 10 AM - 6 PM. You can purchase tickets to the event here. Read More
Can women tolerate more pain than men? Though Mythbusters has already weighed in on the side of lady endurance, one brave doctor has decided to take the experiment even further.  After all, says Dr. Andrew Rochford, “there’s not one man in the world who's been through the most painful experience of them all: childbirth." Guided by an obstetrician, Dr. Rochford decided to personally undergo simulated labor pains through low-voltage electrodes attached to his abdomen. Read More
Yes, it's true: the deadline for applications to the third-annual BUST Magazine Craftacular at World Maker Faire in New York is today. We're excited to be a part of the biggest DIY festival in the world, and we're looking forward to seeing all our favorite makers and meeting new friends (like WORN Fashion Journal, who gave BUST a shout-out yesterday-- hi!). We're just waiting on one more thing-- YOU. If you haven't applied yet, the time is now. We're going to be notifying applicants of their acceptance by the end of the week, so if you want almost-instant gratification, apply now. Read More
We may still be in the dog days of summer, and you may still be waking up every hour convinced that you are going to drown in your own sweat, but something cool is coming this way: fall is around the corner, and so is the BUST Magazine Craftacular at World Maker Faire!  Every year, the grounds around the New York Hall of Science in Queens become the home of the world's largest DIY festival, the World Maker Faire. Read More
As annoying as the characterization of women as sex objects in Fifty Shades of Grey may be, perhaps my friends have an excuse for enjoying it. A biological excuse. According to a recent study published in the European Journal of Social Psychology, our brains may recognize men and women differently. Specifically, they register females as body parts more easily than males. It's not just the male brain, either. Read More
The passing of Sally Ride (61) yesterday prompted many to remember and celebrate her influence. The first American woman in space in 1983, Ride took her role as a role model to young women seriously, creating the Sally Ride Science foundation in 2001. The program reaches out to boys and girls to interest them in the areas of math and science, fields that fascinated a young Sally enough to make her pursue a career in physics. She died a celebrated physicist and cosmonaut. Sally made her history-changing trip to space in 1983 on the United States Challenger. Read More