Tag » science
Though we didn’t need scientific research to confirm that sexual violence is a major problem among young adults, the statistics are now official: A study appearing in the journal JAMA Pediatrics surveyed 1,058 young adults and the revolting results indicated that 8% of Americans between the ages of 14 and 21 have committed some form of sexual violence, defined as “kissing, touching, or making someone else do something sexual” when the perpetrator ... Read More
Science, that all-knowing amorphous body of research and truth, is revealing more and more about the neurophysiological causes of spontaneous orgasm, specifically in women. In a recent analysis of this phenomenon, The New York Times science reporter William J. Broad investigates a Rutgers University project where female brains were scanned while thinking about erotic fantasies.  Broad recognizes that this isn’t a new idea: sexologist ... Read More
Whenever I come across an article about the world’s latest wonder-child, I think back to how my ten-year-old self was incapable of accomplishing little more than consuming every episode of Sailor Moon. But the youths of today are a whole different story. Motivation? Vegetables? Science?! This time, a 13-year-old has revolutionized the way humans and pets can interact with each other at long-distances. Brooke Martin, who just started the ninth grade, is the ... Read More
      We’ve all been taught that drinking isn’t very ladylike: my mother cautioned me as a child not to drink before I was of age because she “embarrassed herself” in her youth. I never asked any questions, and I didn’t drink more than a sip until that lychee martini I had on my 21st birthday. On the other hand, my father got made fun of for not liking alcohol in his younger days; today, people still tell him to ... Read More
Meet Tsunami, the cancer-fighting dog You’ve heard stories about dogs saving lives (my own dog shielded me from a fire when I was a newborn!), but here’s a new one for you: some really amazing dogs are learning how to detect ovarian cancer before modern medicine can. That’s right: dogs can detect faint odors associated with the disease.    The dogs over at the University of Pennsylvania’s Working Dog Center are being trained to ... Read More
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