Tag » science
Women born with a rare disease called Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome just got the greatest gift of all: A VAGINA. Although women with this condition have vulvas, they lack a vaginal cavity and thus live without many common pleasures of a vagina: masturbation, menstruation, sex and a deep, psychological connection with a coochie. Fortunately, by applying a technique developed in the 1990s, Scientists have discovered the ability grow a synthetic vagina from the patients cells. Then, boom, they implant the spankin’ new vag. Read More
The next time someone asks who you're knitting that sweater for, say your brain.  It's long been assumed that creative types like Sylvia Plath are somehow more susceptible to depression, when in fact the opposite might be true; writing poems may have been her brain's way of fighting depression.  "When we are involved in (creativity), we feel that we are living more fully than during the rest of life," says Psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. "You know that what you need to do is possible to do, even though difficult, and sense of time disappears. You forget yourself. Read More
YouTube can be a major time-waster, or a super productive educator. Typically the difference in how you use it depends on what time of the day/night you're browsing, how many glasses of wine you may or may not have had, and how stressful your day has been. I don't think I have to outline the correlation between cat video watching and the number of times you made a mistake at work. Read More
  There’s been a lot of buzz around a new study that examines the differences between male and female brains. The study, conducted by the University of Pennsylvania’s Ragini Verma and her colleagues and recently published in the journal PNAS, uses advanced imaging to map the connectivity of the left and right brain hemispheres of males and females. The researchers concluded that male and female brains have fundamental differences: males have more interconnectivity in each hemisphere, while women have more connectivity between the two. Read More
We hear it all the time: sex sells. And it’s true. As the art critic John Berger has suggested, advertisements are effective when they sell a fantasy: buy this product, and you will be envied by all. Women in both art and advertising are often posed for the male gaze; in other words, even if there’s a man in an ad photo, the woman is shown facing the consumer, promising to be just as attainable as the product she sells. Her body is symbolically up-for-grabs to anyone who can afford the wristwatch or cologne she markets. Read More