Tag » science
YouTube can be a major time-waster, or a super productive educator. Typically the difference in how you use it depends on what time of the day/night you're browsing, how many glasses of wine you may or may not have had, and how stressful your day has been. I don't think I have to outline the correlation between cat video watching and the number of times you made a mistake at work. Read More
  There’s been a lot of buzz around a new study that examines the differences between male and female brains. The study, conducted by the University of Pennsylvania’s Ragini Verma and her colleagues and recently published in the journal PNAS, uses advanced imaging to map the connectivity of the left and right brain hemispheres of males and females. The researchers concluded that male and female brains have fundamental differences: males have more interconnectivity in each hemisphere, while women have more connectivity between the two. Read More
We hear it all the time: sex sells. And it’s true. As the art critic John Berger has suggested, advertisements are effective when they sell a fantasy: buy this product, and you will be envied by all. Women in both art and advertising are often posed for the male gaze; in other words, even if there’s a man in an ad photo, the woman is shown facing the consumer, promising to be just as attainable as the product she sells. Her body is symbolically up-for-grabs to anyone who can afford the wristwatch or cologne she markets. Read More
  The other day I was listening to an old episode of This American Life with Ira Glass called “Testosterone.” In one story, a transgender male feminist explained how his eyes uncontrollably wandered to female bodies when he took testosterone. He was heartbroken by the fact that he spent more time looking at chests than faces. Read More
Ahhh...the sweet smell of awesome women: According to a new report compiled at the University of Montreal, lady doctors out-perform their male counterparts in every way. Yes, all of them.  The study observed the diabetes-related care provided by 870 physicians, with even numbers of male and female participants. The participants were scored on three different levels of diabetic care: prescribing eye exams, scheduling physicals, and prescribing a special mix of medications. In every category, men were outperformed by women. Read More