Tag » science
  There’s been a lot of buzz around a new study that examines the differences between male and female brains. The study, conducted by the University of Pennsylvania’s Ragini Verma and her colleagues and recently published in the journal PNAS, uses advanced imaging to map the connectivity of the left and right brain hemispheres of males and females. The researchers concluded that male and female brains have fundamental differences: males have ... Read More
We hear it all the time: sex sells. And it’s true. As the art critic John Berger has suggested, advertisements are effective when they sell a fantasy: buy this product, and you will be envied by all. Women in both art and advertising are often posed for the male gaze; in other words, even if there’s a man in an ad photo, the woman is shown facing the consumer, promising to be just as attainable as the product she sells. Her body is symbolically ... Read More
  The other day I was listening to an old episode of This American Life with Ira Glass called “Testosterone.” In one story, a transgender male feminist explained how his eyes uncontrollably wandered to female bodies when he took testosterone. He was heartbroken by the fact that he spent more time looking at chests than faces. Of course, his experience is a subjective and personal one that should by no means be applied to all men (cis or trans), ... Read More
Ahhh...the sweet smell of awesome women: According to a new report compiled at the University of Montreal, lady doctors out-perform their male counterparts in every way. Yes, all of them.  The study observed the diabetes-related care provided by 870 physicians, with even numbers of male and female participants. The participants were scored on three different levels of diabetic care: prescribing eye exams, scheduling physicals, and prescribing a special mix of ... Read More
  In a sexist society, women are conditioned to be cheerful and peppy and men are trained to be confrontational and ambitious. The expectations placed on individuals based on gender contribute to some awful things like assertive women being called “shrews” or kind men being considered weak.    A new study by the Institute of Information Technology in Canada’s Saif Mohammad and Tony Yang suggests that we might internalize these ... Read More
Quick: name a famous inventor. Is it a man? Women continue to fight hard to gain recognition as inventors. Scientific fields and patenting usually favor the dudes, but women created a lot of things that make our modern lives easy and efficient. We were inspired by Mental Floss's list of inventions by ladies and wanted to share them (and add a few), so take a look at twenty five items to be thankful for, and give these women a big round of ... Read More
Dr. Danielle N. Lee is an animal behavior and ecology post-doc biologist, a hip-hop maven, and a contributing blogger for Scientific American. As stated on Scientific American’s website, Lee’s section, “The Urban Scientist,” focuses on “urban ecology, evolutionary biology & diversity in the sciences.” Recently, Lee was approached by a Biology Online blog editor, whose name is known as “Ofek,” to the guest ... Read More
Though we didn’t need scientific research to confirm that sexual violence is a major problem among young adults, the statistics are now official: A study appearing in the journal JAMA Pediatrics surveyed 1,058 young adults and the revolting results indicated that 8% of Americans between the ages of 14 and 21 have committed some form of sexual violence, defined as “kissing, touching, or making someone else do something sexual” when the perpetrator ... Read More
Science, that all-knowing amorphous body of research and truth, is revealing more and more about the neurophysiological causes of spontaneous orgasm, specifically in women. In a recent analysis of this phenomenon, The New York Times science reporter William J. Broad investigates a Rutgers University project where female brains were scanned while thinking about erotic fantasies.  Broad recognizes that this isn’t a new idea: sexologist ... Read More
Whenever I come across an article about the world’s latest wonder-child, I think back to how my ten-year-old self was incapable of accomplishing little more than consuming every episode of Sailor Moon. But the youths of today are a whole different story. Motivation? Vegetables? Science?! This time, a 13-year-old has revolutionized the way humans and pets can interact with each other at long-distances. Brooke Martin, who just started the ninth grade, is the ... Read More
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