Tag » romance novels
A new study indicates shame and embarrassment are common emotions in the field—composed of more than 90 percent women—simply because romance novels are seen as silly trash for women. Despite romance novelists’ hard work and dedication to their craft, it seems this negative reputation is here to stay. According to sociologists Jennifer Lois and Joanna Gregson, “The genre is written by women, for women, about women – and that’s where the stigma comes from. Read More
Mark your calendars, girls! On April 8, Ann Brashares is releasing her newest book, The Here and Now. The novel follows Prenna James, a time traveling seventeen year old who returns to the present-day in attempt to save humanity from a plague that will end all life on earth. Brashares, the author who defined a generation of girls with her Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants series, has ventured into strange and nearly sci-fi territory with her new book — but like the Pants heroines, Prenna still grapples with young love. Read More
In A Lady Awakened, the heroine uses the hero for sex (Bantam) Heaving… Bosoms… I’m sure we all can admit that we have skimmed the romance novel section at a bookstore or finished an entire panty-scorcher at the beach… She storyline is all-too-familiar… An example of a NON-Feminist Romance Novel/Memoir Well, according to Jessica Luther, writing for The Atlantic, there is a new genre in town. It is sexy, smart, and features a strong female protagonist who doesn’t fall for the violent, brooding fella. Read More
I’m no stranger to smut. Like many girls, my earliest sex-ed experience was thumbing through my mom’s Jude Deveraux novels, trying to decipher all the euphemisms in the sex scenes. I’m not personally one who, ahem, needs a lot of back story when it comes to this sort of thing — I prefer the short-form stuff (like BUST’s One Handed Reads!). But I’ve always respected the genre. I’ve always assumed that erotica is like poetry or horror movies — particularly tough to get right, but the good stuff must be transcendent. Read More
Last week, a woman with a Kindle sat next to me on the subway on my way to work. Because I am nosy, and because I had just been wishing I had a Kindle, I glanced to my right to admire her light, easy-to-read device. Instead, I immediately caught a glimpse of a rampant sex scene (she was clearly using the largest text setting and leaning forward, in my defense). What was I to do, except continue reading over her shoulder? For the next 10 minutes, I enthusiastically read along with my train companion about the exploits of Jay and Ashlee. Read More