Tag » poetry
Writing good poetry requires talent, but being able to deliver at Poetry Slams and bring people to tears is another thing entirely. A performance done by a woman named Samantha Peterson called “Dead Men Can’t Catcall” is floating around the web right now among my friends. After hearing the title, I knew I had to watch and share it. She performed this piece at CUPSI (College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational) this year at Finals. Read More
Spoken word is an incredible art, combining poetic verse and performance in a gutsy display of intelligence and emotion. It takes a true artist to stand behind a microphone and move an entire room with imaginative word choice and a punch-you-in-the-gut-powerful delivery. Read More
When we talk about Harry Potter and JK Rowling, it is largely with high praise. Rowling is a powerful female author and creator of an entire fantasy world that has inspired countless people of all ages across the globe. That's all fine and dandy, but Rachel Rostad wants to cut the shit and be the one to say what others won't, and highlight the series' lack of dynamic characters of color. Just listen to what she has to say: Omg she is such a badass. When considering the reach of Harry Potter, it seems like a colossal waste to default to tokenized and flat characters of color. Read More
Poetry and feminism go hand in hand, as illustrated by the feminist poet warriors of the past and present, including Adrienne Rich, Ann Sexton, Maya Angelou and Margaret Atwood to name a few. In her famous essay "Poetry is Not a Luxury," Audre Lorde expertly expresses the linkage of feminism and poetic verse: "For women, then, poetry is not a luxury. It is a vital necessity of our existence. It forms the quality of the light within which we predicate our hopes and dreams toward survival and change, first made into language, then into idea, then into more tangible action. Read More
Mary Wollstonecraft Shelly As children, dolls can be physical manifestations of our most intimate fantasy worlds. We can develop entire histories and personalities for our dolls, and they can help us to navigate the adult world. As we grow, we similarly idolize and identify with authors and fictional characters. The women writers whose work survives to today remind us that we’re not alone, that another woman somewhere understood our feelings about being human beings and about being women. Read More
  Mary Oliver’s position as a female poet has long been questioned by critics. Some find her alliance with nature anti-feminist, claiming that her use of natural imagery echoes those of the male romantic poets. Sadly, romantic poetry is seen to assume the speaker-- presumed male--reaches an enlightened realm of immortality that the natural world-- coded female-- never can. Read More
  Sylvia Plath is known mostly for her poetry and prose, but arguably the same degree of violent, exuberant feeling may be found in her sketch work, now published in a volume entitled Sylvia Plath: Drawings. Edited by the poet’s own daughter Frieda Hughes, the text cradles her pen-and-ink drawings with diary entries and letters.      Plath created the illustrations at Cambridge, and used studied art as a way of coping with and cataloguing her experience. In a letter, she writes her mother “I’ve discovered my deepest source of inspiration, which is art [. Read More
  Happy Hallow's Eve's Eve, BUSTies! As another year comes to a close we don our carefully crafted outfits and munch on yummy candy, new controversies erupt over what costumes are socially acceptable or too revealing. And a lot of times, these conversations revolve around what women are entitled to wear. So before you head out tomorrow, take a listen to this awesome slam poetry from Washington D.C’s Brave New Voices Grand Slam Finals 2013. Because despite how we feel about barely-there costumes and the like, we women are all in this together. Read More
Young people notice. And as they grow, they internalize. But they also reflect and speak out. Lily Myers raises her voice through poetry. The Wesleyan University student was awarded Best Love Poem last April at the College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational (CUPSI) for her spoken word piece, “Shrinking Women.” It’s an on-point expression of the anxieties and pressures women and girls face regarding their self-image and how it’s different from what many (but certainly not all) men and boys experience. Read More
Since 1993, artist Nina Katchadourian has been reworking books and their titles in her own ongoing visual and literary art project entitled Sorted Books.  Katchadourian combs through books, pulling particular titles and grouping books together to form short sequences of titles that can be read together.  She collects books from different places, ranging from private homes to public collections. Read More
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