Tag » npr
If you grew up in the United States, at some point in your elementary education you were probably asked to craft, color, read about or dress up like pilgrims and Indians around this time of year. I distinctly remember standing with the rest of my classmates, donning a paper bonnet and apron, as we performed a skit about sailing on the Mayflower and landing at Plymouth Rock. It wasn’t until I was 20 years old that I actually learned some of the real history behind Thanksgiving—like that the settlers plagued Native Americans with all kinds of devastation. Read More
Imagine a world where men dominate and women are expected to fit into the societal boxes arranged for them. Not too hard to picture, right? Well in Bitch Planet, the amazing feminist comic from the minds of Kelly Sue DeConnick, not following suit with gender role expected of women lands you a spot on a prison planet with the label “terminally noncompliant. Read More
  Chrissie Hynde is still defending the victim blaming comments she made after there release of her memoir Reckless, only this time she has added a sprinkle of racism on top. Hynde, the iconic front-woman of The Pretenders, was fairly defensive and rude during her interview yesterday morning with NPR's David Greene.  Greene asked Hynde to describe some of the experiences she wrote about in her book–like the time she was assaulted by a group of bikers and proceeded to take responsibility for it. Read More
Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR), an NYC-based media watch organization, recently conducted its third study on the diversity of commentators on NPR. NPR is known as a liberal/intellectual media haven, so its lack of diversity is particularly disappointing—especially because NPR’s strategic plan includes an impending goal of featuring “stories at the intersection of race, ethnicity, and culture.” That’s pretty hard to do accurately with all white dudes as contributors. Read More
In Terry Gross's NPR interview with writer and editor Jessica Grose, professor of linguistics Penny Eckert, and speech pathologist Susan Sankin, the subject on the table was the policing of young women’s voices. “People are busy policing women’s language and nobody is policing older or younger men’s language,” Eckert says. Two of the speech tics discussed are uptalking (ending a sentence like it’s a question) and vocal fry (drawing out, or rasping, the ends of sentences). The clear double standard here? Men often employ these same tics. Read More