Tag » nigeria
We wrote about the recent passage of a law banning female genital mutilation in Nigeria on Monday, and that isn’t the only feminist news coming out of the African country this week. An all-women’s book club in Nigeria spawned the hashtag #BeingFemaleInNigeria to discuss their experiences of prejudice, sexism, and the unrealistic expectations placed upon them. “The hashtag emerged from a book club based in the capital of Abuja, fronted by young Nigerian woman, Florence Warmate,” Ade Onibada reported for The Voice. Read More
It’s a victory for women everywhere that female genital mutilation has been outlawed in Nigeria. FGM is defined by the World Heath Organization as “procedures that intentionally alter or cause injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons.” It is a cultural practice in some regions, primarily within regions of countries in the Middle East and Africa, and it doesn’t have any health benefits. More than 100 million girls have experienced FGM, which often happens below the age of 15. Read More
Almost one year ago, more than 200 girls were abducted in Chibok, Borno State, Nigeria by the group Boko Haram. The internet was in uproar, people published graphic after graphic, world leaders swore to be involved—but in spite of all those promises and stances, 219 girls are still missing. A series of turbulent events both in the United States and internationally has turned media attention away from these young women and to other issues. International efforts—including negotiating jailed Boko Haram fighters for the girls—has failed. Read More
  Nigerian entrepreneur Taofick Okoya is making a name for himself with a line of dolls called “Queens of Africa.” After trying to purchase a doll for his niece at the store and finding only whitewashed toys, he realized  stores in Nigeria were not carrying black dolls—and decided it was a major problem (which, of course, it absolutely is). Okoya took matters into his own hands by creating products that “to promote a positive self-identity... as well as preserve African culture. Read More
The Supreme Price is a new documentary that follows the evolution of the Pro-Democracy Movement in Nigeria and the push to increase female involvement in leadership roles. Director Joanna Lipper follows the daughter, Hafsat Abiola, of former president M.K.O Abiola and Kudirat Abiola. Shortly after her father was elected in 1993, he was imprisoned. Her mother took over leadership of the pro-democracy movement, organized strikes, marches, and gained national attention for the Nigerian struggle. Kudirat was severely stalked and pestered and was assassinated by agents of the military in 1996. Read More
After a few days of relatively calm news coverage on the matter, Boko Haram have unfortunately resumed their acts of terror in Nigeria. On June 18, the terrorist group kidnapped 60 more women, including some as young as 3 years old, and killed 30 men in a village raid.  After completely stripping it off all food and supplies, the group used petrol bombs to destroy the village of Kummabaza in Borneo.  According to CNN, news of this attack was halted due to the destruction of local telecom masts and few survivors making the journey out of the destroyed village alive. Read More
Just in case you needed more evidence that girls can excel in science as well as guys, here it is: fourteen-year-olds Duro-Aina Adebola, Akindele Abiola, Faleke Oluwatoyin and 15-year-old Bello Eniola have built a power generator that can create six hours-worth of electricity using a liter of urine as fuel.  The young women displayed their invention at Maker Faire, an annual event in Lagos, Nigeria.  The Maker Faire Blog explains how the urine-powered generator works: • Urine is put into an electrolytic cell, which separates out the hydrogen. Read More
Nigerian-American novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has a lot of intelligent things to say about the troubling new "anti-gay" legislation up for debate in her home country. As all democratic civilizations bend towards our generation's central civil rights debate, it's refreshing to hear a writer speak out with such conviction. Here's an excerpt from her speech: The new law that criminalizes homosexuality is popular among Nigerians. Read More
The Nigeria Women Football League has announced an official ban of lesbians from Nigerian women’s soccer.  Dilichukwu Onyedinma, a member of the Nigerian Football Federation (NFF) announced earlier this week that “Any player that we find is associated with [lesbianism] will be disqualified. Read More
Last week at Maker Faire Africa, four Nigerian teenage girls presented a generator powered by—wait for it—pee. Duro-Aina Adebola, Akindele Abiola, and Faleke Oluwatoyin, all 14, and Bello Eniola, 15, invented the machine, which separates hydrogen from urine with an electrolytic cell, purifies the hydrogen, and pressurizes the resulting gas through a generator to power a lightbulb. According to the girls, one liter of urine can produce up to 6 hours of electricity. Read More
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