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London's Fat White Family are a refreshingly unique band with a bratty name, one that might just keep the kind of people who would really like them from checking them out. Their newest release, Champagne Holocaust, isn’t a true new release—it previously existed on the band’s Bandcamp page, and has now been given an official CD release on Fat Possum Records. That same freedom from convention can be found in Fat White Family’s music—simply put, they play whatever they feel like playing. Read More
It seems fitting that Jessica Weiss began penning songs as soundtracks to student films since the Brighton-based lead singer and songwriter’s lyrics are rife with vivid imagery, intense drama, and compelling storylines. Fellow art student Guitarist Daniel Falvey met Weiss after an exhibition of her work inspired him, and drummer Michael Miles was later brought in to handle percussion. Together shoegaze trio Fear of Men creates a bittersweet sound by blending deceitfully upbeat melodies with melancholy tales. Read More
What do swimming pools, sexual voyeurism, elevators, and eco-terrorist extraterrestrials have in common? They’re all the subjects of songs on Hotel Valentine, Cibo Matto’s first release in 15 years. Much of the album is written from the perspective of a wry ghost who haunts a hotel and delivers deadpan lines like, “I had some cheese and seedless grapes for lunch and floated around for the rest of the afternoon.” The band’s Japanese-born, N.Y.C. Read More
Here’s the thing: those of us that are willing to shamelessly drown in the depths of repetitive, predictable, and overtly romantic bro-rock indie music, tend to welcome almost all attempts at acoustic recordings. That’s why when Seattle group Band of Horses released their newest album Band of Horses: Acoustic At The Ryman the mushy hearts of BUST were totally down. In most other places, the album (released on February 11, 2014) was not as well-received, as the record fell short of expectations for a project rich with musical history. Read More
When I tell Loke Rahbek of the Danish band Vär that their debut LP No One Dances Quite Like Our Brothers (Sacred Bones Records) makes me feel like I’ve just drank a little too much GHB, he tells me he actually likes the description. It makes sense to equate Vär’s dark, sludgy electronic feast to the drug commonly associated with date rape. “I knew a guy who died from GHB once,” Rahbek says.  I tell him that you have to be careful on GHB and not mix it with anything else or even take too big of a dose. It is, after all, a date rape drug. Read More