Tag » movies
Ava Duvernay might not have taken home a Globe last night, but that doesn't mean her mere nomination isn't a landmark. Duvernay is the first black female director to be nominated for a Golden Globe, insane as that sounds in 2015. Wait a minute, you may be thinking: We’ve never had a black woman win a Golden Globe for best director before?! Before this year, a black woman has never even been nominated? Sad, but true. Ava DuVernay’s nomination last night was not only well-deserved, it was also ridiculously overdue. Read More
Forget your triple tall morning espresso. There’s a faster way to get your blood boiling: a hearty dose of mansplaining: Russell Crowe, the de facto emissary of all things misogynistic, is at it again. The 50-year-old star of the upcoming film "The Water Diviner" told Australian Women’s Weekly, “To be honest, I think you’ll find that the woman who is saying that [the roles have dried up] is the woman who at 40,45,48, still wants to play the ingénue, and can’t understand why she’s not being cast as the 21-year-old. Read More
In November I responded to one of Seth Rogen’s tweets that invited fans to watch his latest comedy “The Interview” with him over beer and popcorn. Rogen, beer, and popcorn all sounded like a good time to me, so needless to say- I was in. I didn’t know at the time that I would be watching a movie that would then be cancelled from theaters all over the country with Sony Pictures shelving its release entirely over a series of threats from Internet hackers. Read More
  The film version of “Miss Julie” directed by Liv Ullman, and based on the play by August Strindberg, opens up with a young Julie running around an empty house. The child is both lonely and motherless, perhaps giving some context for actions and decisions of an adult Julie, played brilliantly by Jessica Chastain, who is both desperate for and revolted by the affection of others.   The story takes place in Ireland, during Midsummer’s Eve in the year 1890. Read More
The silence used in Pawel Pawlikowski’s award-winning, thoughtful and intense new film “Ida” is deafening. Set in post-Stalinist Poland in the early 1960s, the audience is introduced to a bleak, black and white setting where the noise of footsteps on fallen snow or the sound of a spoon hitting the side of a bowl during breakfast feels like a violent interruption against the backdrop of a still, calm quiet. Almost immediately the audience is introduced to Anna (Agata Trzebuchowska), a teenage girl just a few weeks shy of taking her final vows and becoming a nun. Read More