Tag » movie review
You’ll likely feel a sense of deja vu while watching Bare, the debut feature film from director Natalia Leite. There are shades of movies from What’s Eating Gilbert Grape to Blue Is The Warmest Color to Coyote Ugly, but Bare spans genres: it’s part coming-of-age story, part family drama, part LGBT romance. Though you’ll recognize familiar tropes, Leite’s direction and Dianna Agron’s performance mean that Bare is interesting in a way that feels new. Read More
Comedian Sarah Silverman shows her dramatic side in I Smile Back, a dark suburban drama about addiction and mental illness. Silverman’s character, Laney, is living a seemingly perfect life as a housewife and mother of two. But beneath the surface, she’s addicted to drugs, booze, and sex: an early scene shows her sleeping with her husband’s friend, doing coke, and then going to pick her kids up from school. After a binge leads to a collapse, she reluctantly goes to rehab. Read More
Wildlike, an indie film directed and written by Frank Hall Green, was a thoughtful look into the experience of a teenage victim of sexual assault. It had good intentions, iffy acting, a slow rhythm and most of all–desperately needed a trigger warning. Basic criticism aside, the film takes a new angle on displaying the point of view of a survivor of sexual assault. If it is one thing Mackenzie (Ella Purnell) is, it's a survivor. Moving in with her uncle (Brian Geraghty) in Alaska, Mackenzie's future is at first seemingly full of opportunity. Read More
"The Keeping Room," directed by Daniel Barber, tells the story of three women in the apocalyptic last days of the Civil War.  With all the men gone, two sisters (Brit Marling and Hailee Steinfeld) and their slave (Muna Otaru) are struggling to survive. Their tense peace is shattered when, in search of medicine, the oldest sister Augusta (Marling) captures the attention of two rogue Yankee soldiers. Read More
Grandma Written and directed by Paul Weltz Out August 21 Grandma is one of those rare films that’s entirely about women. There are a handful of men, but none appear in more than one scene. Instead, the story focuses on a family of strong, complicated women. Lily Tomlin drives the film with her performance as Elle, the grandma from which the film takes its title. Elle is mourning both the death of her longtime partner and her recent breakup with her much-younger girlfriend (Judy Greer) when her teenage granddaughter, Sage (Julia Garner), asks for help. Read More