Tag » misogyny
Yesterday, actress Caitlin Stasey wrote a story for Jezebel about her recent altercation with a misogynist magazine editor. Earlier this year, Stasey launched a website called Herself.com, which is a “safe space for women of varying backgrounds, body types and belief systems to amplify their concerns, wishes, dreams, complaints and woes—a platform dedicated to expanding the scope of visible female experience and of visible female bodies.” According the Stasey, “The courageous, luminescent women you will find there are nude, shot by female photographers. Read More
  Need a little pick-me-up this evening? Here’s a heartwarming tale of boys just bein’ boys! Professor emeritus Paula Nicolson, of Royal Holloway University, discusses in the Times Higher Education Supplement some of the struggles that women deal with in the workplace. One of those struggles? Sexism is used by men “as a bonding experience.” D’aww! Male bonding! Nicolson’s remarks follow the uproar in response to Tim Hunt’s comments about female scientists working alongside male scientists. Read More
Meninism is not defined in the dictionary because meninism is not a valid term or movement. The two men who run the Meninism Tweet Twitter account say meninism is “(parody) obviously sarcasm.” Meninism is not advocating for men’s rights. It is not fighting any of the issues men face. Meninism is simply a mockery of feminism and all that it stands for.  “#Meninism” and “#Meninist” have exploded on Twitter. The account and accompanying hashtags have more than 900 thousand followers, some of whom own shirts bearing the #Meninist logo. Read More
Gwyneth Paltrow is done with getting compared to other women in Hollywood who run successful companies. In an interview with TIME Magazine, Paltrow was asked if she looked at the lifestyle brands created by several other actresses. Her brilliant response? “I wonder if George Clooney would be asked about Puff Daddy’s ancillary liquor line. Read More
When Maggie Young started writing a memoir about the 23 men she slept with between the ages of 16 and 26, she didn’t expect it to become a liberating and relatable story for women living in an age still plagued by misogynistic treatment, absurd double standards, and impossible expectations. But that’s exactly what Just Another Number is: A raw, honest reflection on her adolescence through early adulthood that fearlessly details her struggles with bulimia, drugs, the military, and her dependence on male approval. Read More
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