Tag » marketing
This Sunday, May 11, we will celebrate the mothers in our lives, those women who, with the help of our fathers and other mentors, taught us how to be good people, whose shoulders we cried on and whose laughter brightened our days. In celebration of the holiday, international clothing brand Desigual released a mystifying commercial, one which many have found sexist and insulting. The ad presents a young woman trying on a slinky, colorful dress; catching her reflection in a mirror, she stuffs the abdomen of her garment with a cushion. Read More
  A few weeks back, we were so thrilled to hear that Aerie, the teen lingerie store affiliated with American Eagle, will not be Photoshopping their models for their new Spring campaign titled #AerieREAL. The ad images feature models ranging in size, shape, and ethnicity (this range is vast relative to most competitors, although, to be honest, it still does not encompass the diversity of America’s teens). Read More
  Almost every home product advertisement you can think of features a woman acting out a pretty stereotypical domestic role; you’d think all we spend our time doing was wiping counters and asking our rambunctious husbands and sons to take their shoes off. In the wake of the recent Super Bowl ad frenzy, comes this amazing parody video advertising a product called “Swiffle. Read More
  A recent Pantene ad titled “Labels Against Women” has sparked a feminist debate: is it okay for the company to use feminism to sell products? Some think that the use of feminism in advertising is a great way to appeal to the masses and to sneak difficult ideas on inequality and wage gaps into pop culture; the ad has been touted as a powerful beacon for women in the workplace. Read More
We hear it all the time: sex sells. And it’s true. As the art critic John Berger has suggested, advertisements are effective when they sell a fantasy: buy this product, and you will be envied by all. Women in both art and advertising are often posed for the male gaze; in other words, even if there’s a man in an ad photo, the woman is shown facing the consumer, promising to be just as attainable as the product she sells. Her body is symbolically up-for-grabs to anyone who can afford the wristwatch or cologne she markets. Read More