Tag » malala yousafzai
The recent shooting of Malala Yousafzai has torn me up. Deeply. You’d have to be an automaton to feel anything but grief. But she continues to hang on, and along with the rest of the world, I'm hoping that her doctors' most recent predictions--that she'll make a "decent recovery"--will turn out to be true.     I mourn the disruption, if not the destruction, of a young and very promising life. But violence is often a response to fear, and it gives me hope—real, fierce hope—that the Taliban is so terrified of a teenage girl. They should be. Read More
Malala Yousafzai, the 14-year-old Pakistani blogger who was shot by the Taliban last week for being an advocate for girls' education, has been moved from Pakistan to a U.K. hospital specializing in pediatric trauma. Malala traveled to the U.K. via an air ambulance provided by the United Arab Emirates. Her departure was kept a secret until she was out of Pakistan due to safety concerns.  Both of the bullets that were lodged in her head and neck have been removed, and she remains in stable, though serious, condition. Read More
The Taliban shooting of 14-year-old girls’ education rights activist Malala Yousafzai has united Pakistanis in their condemnation of the attack and their support for Malala. Protests and vigils have been held around the country, with some protestors declaring, “I am Malala,” and others carrying a banner reading, “We want our daughters to be like Malala.” Pakistan’s president, prime minster, and political leaders joined Amnesty International and the United Nations in condemning the attack, according to NBC News. Read More
  Malala Yousafzai is in “satisfactory” condition at a military hospital, but the next few days will be critical, the Associated Press reported today. The 14-year-old Pakistani girls’ education rights activist was shot by a Taliban gunman on Tuesday.  The spokesman, Maj. Gen. Asim Saleem Bajwa, said she is being kept unconscious and on a ventilator, and that it was too soon to say whether she had any significant head injury. The bullet entered her head and went into her neck towards the spine. Doctors operated to remove the bullet. Read More
Malala Yousafzai began her activism at age 11. In early 2009, she began writing a blog for BBC Urdu about her life in Swat Valley as the Taliban banned girls’ education.  On Tuesday, the 14-year-old Pakistani education rights activist was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman, and she is currently in critical condition. The following are excerpts from her blog, all published by BBC Urdu in January 2009. This is what Malala fought for. This is why the Taliban targeted a 14-year-old girl.   • I had a terrible dream yesterday with military helicopters and the Taleban. Read More
Malala Yousafzai began her activism at age 11. In early 2009, she began writing a blog for BBC Urdu about her life in Swat Valley as the Taliban banned girls’ education.  On Tuesday, the 14-year-old Pakistani education rights activist was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman, and she is currently in critical condition. The following are excerpts from her blog, all published by BBC Urdu in January 2009. This is what Malala fought for. This is why the Taliban targeted a 14-year-old girl.   • I had a terrible dream yesterday with military helicopters and the Taleban. Read More
Girls in school uniforms in Haiti Happy International Day Of The Girl! If you haven’t heard, today is the UN’s first-ever International Day Of The Girl. Today, people around the world will come together to talk about girls: their rights, their lives, and what we can do to empower them. Read More
As we blogged yesterday, Malala Yousafzai, the 14-year-old activist from Pakistan, was shot in the head and neck after members of the Taliban held up the van she was riding home from school in. The bullet barely missed Malala’s brain, and other students also suffered injuries.  The shooters have been identified, but the Taliban is still promising to kill Malala if she survives.  She has been especially active in advocating for girls’ education, something that the Taliban wants to end. Read More
"Where I live, there are some people who want to stop educating girls through guns," the father of Pakistani education rights activist Malala Yousafzai told The New York Times in a documentary titled 'Class Dismissed.' "I want to get my education and I want to become a doctor," she added in the 2009 feature. But this Tuesday, the National Peace Award for Youth recipient, esteemed BBC blogger, and two-time Times documentary star paid a high price for her bravery. Read More
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