Tag » literature
A new study indicates shame and embarrassment are common emotions in the field—composed of more than 90 percent women—simply because romance novels are seen as silly trash for women. Despite romance novelists’ hard work and dedication to their craft, it seems this negative reputation is here to stay. According to sociologists Jennifer Lois and Joanna Gregson, “The genre is written by women, for women, about women – and that’s where the stigma comes from. Read More
Toni Morrison has been a powerhouse of wisdom and truth ever since her first book, The Bluest Eye, was published in 1970. We have hung on her every word and yearned for the guidance in her novels. Fittingly, she has acquired a heap of achievements including a Nobel Prize, Pulitzer Prize, and a Presidential Medal of Freedom. And she doesn’t seem to be slowing down in the poignant department as she approaches 84 glorious years of age. Her recent novel, God Save The Child, is just as richly detailed and meaningful as anything she’s ever written. Read More
Last week, the winner of the most important accolade in the literary world was announced. I am, of course, talking about the Literary Review's Bad Sex in Fiction Award. Forget the National Book Award. Back off, Pulitzer. Man Booker who? An Oprah’s Book Club Sticker has more influence than all those combined. The real prestige comes with winning a Bad Sex in Fiction award. It means your work was good enough that those other prizes could ignore your terrible sex writing (can we retire the word “womb” in a sexual context, please?). Read More
Have you ever wondered how texting might have changed the dialogue in Les Misérables? Mallory Ortberg, cofounder of The Toast (only the funniest website written by and for ladies) and all around reigning queen of Twitter, has taken this idea and ran with it. Texts from Jane Eyre (Henry Holt Nov. 4 2014) is the beautiful result: a collection of the best imagined conversations with all the characters from the literary classics. Read More
Violette, the latest film by Martin Provost, stars the brilliant Emmanuelle Devos as revolutionary feminist author Violette Leduc, and Sandrine Kiberlain as the infamous writer and social theorist, Simone de Beauvoir. Presented by Adopt Films, the drama delves into the complexities and at times, emotional turmoil, of Leduc. The film captures her fascination and intense attachment for de Beauvoir, and the conviction de Beauvoir feels to share her unrivaled honesty with the literary world. The film is split into chapters, and it certainly reads like a novel. Read More
I think that women should be proud of and identify with women who do things at a very high level of excellence, and not criticize them for not expressing a feminine sensibility or a feminine sense of sensuality. My idea is to desegregate everything. —from Susan Sontag: The Complete Rolling Stone Interview April 11th, 2014 Again. Again, today, I was asked if I read. Considering I sit behind the cash register of a small independent book store, day in and day out, surrounded with literature, poetry and philosophy, this question baffles me. It’s baffling but also incredibly insulting. Read More
  In 1919, E.E. Cummings impregnated his lover, the separated wife of his beloved friend Scofield Thayer, Elaine. Unfortunately, Cummings left Elaine and the child alone and abandoned, and Thayer took on the role of the girl’s father until he and Elaine officially divorced one year later.      But this story isn’t a tragic one; it’s a poignant one about doing the best we can for those we love. After that year apart, Cummings could no longer refuse to acknowledge his daughter. Read More
  I am so sick of the lame old stereotype “women are more emotional than men.” Aside from being blatantly false, it does damage. Often, women are disrespected in the workplace if we get heated over something important, or we’re told to “stop PMS-ing” if we have a personal drama. I will always remember the Sex and the City episode in which Samantha Jones is berated for being a working woman and cries only when she gets in the elevator. Read More
Who doesn't secretly dream of owning their own bookshop? Rows of yellowing volumes filled with harrowing tales, a pastel sundress for every day of the week, a grumpy Ron Swanson-esque cat on the windowsill...It would be like living in a Joanna Newsom music video. Finally, the chance to make that asbestos-filled dream a reality has arrived! The owners of Chicago's Women and Children First, one of the last independent feminist bookstores in the United States, are looking to hand over the master key to a new owner. Read More
Growing up an avid reader, my love for fictional female characters was funneled towards girls who shared my love of literature. Roald Dahl's Matilda was always something of a soul sister, and I found another when I tuned into the WB (guys, remember the WB?!) and met Rory Gilmore. Gilmore Girls quickly became one of my favorite shows; my mom and I would make plans to watch together and try to imitate the fast-talking, binge-eating, straight-shooting style of Lorelai and Rory. Read More