Tag » internet
If you're ever wondering where awesome gifs like these come from, the answer is, as usual: a weirdly sexist internet video!!        If you thought the nineties was all Bjork and Julia Stiles, The Wifey is here to set you straight. The gems are not purely visual, folks. Read More
  In this week of Facebook lookbacks and overall viral nostalgia, it’s becoming clear that much of our public persona is expressed through the internet, whether we like it or not. So it reasons that we should have all the tools available to make our social media presence as true to ourselves as we wish. This is part of why Facebook’s announcement today is so meaningful: in addition to “Male” and “Female” settings, people who identify outside of the gender binary now have a “Custom” gender setting at their disposal. Read More
  Even though it’s a site that now features the incredible number of over 3.5 million articles written in the English language, Wikipedia’s female writers only make up just 13% of the overall contributors. But this past weekend, the international Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon went down across the globe where around 600 participants in 31 venues collectively confronted the persistent issue of Wikipedia’s gendered bias. The inclusion of women as contributors and subjects of the ever influential online encyclopedia is a total necessity. Read More
  For many young feminists, the “selfie” has been claimed as a fulfilling expressive medium that lends itself to self-actualization and confidence. The artist Lindsay Bottos explains, “The act of women taking selfies is inherently feminist, especially in a society that tries so hard to tell women that our bodies are projects to be worked on […] Selfies are like a ‘fuck you’ to all of that. Read More
  The artist Addie Wagenknecht is known for her critical examinations of internet culture. In the past, she has staged performance art pieces revealing the appeal of anonymity. She has created internet pages that refuse to load, revealing our urgent need for gratification through imagery. In Brussels’s recent Digital Now exhibit, she uses the internet and technology, tools that she admits are generally controlled by men, to create groundbreaking and sometimes unsettling portraits of modern womanhood. Read More