Tag » hollaback
Happy Friday BUSTies! It’s officially the weekend, and we know you deserve a treat after a week of kicking ass. So, here are some of this week’s feminist new stories to catch up on while you unwind with a few cocktails or an entire pizza, whatever strikes your fancy ‘cause it’s the freakin’ weekend. Read More
Badass Twitter activist Mikki Kendall created the hashtag #FirstHarassed to open up the conversation about when women first begin to experience sexual harassment. Unsurprisingly, the phrase quickly went viral; also unsurprisingly, harassment starts early for most girls. Ugh.   The anecdotes that have been accumulating on Twitter are substantiated by recent research from Hollaback! and the organization's survey on street harassment — the biggest and most international one to date. Read More
Adult Wednesday Addams has zero tolerance for catcallers and handles them in a way that only an Addams could: with swift and painful vengeance. While minding her own damn business, a truck full of dudebros rides by this updated version of our favorite Addams family member, and one of them decides it's a good idea to tell her she'd look prettier if she smiled. He goes on to ask her to sit on his face, and even calls her a “goth bitch. Read More
Lately, street harassment has been getting more of the public attention it deserves, but women still have to face disgusting comments as they walk down the street. Artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, 29, traveled to Mexico City and to create an installation of her street harassment project, “Stop Telling Women to Smile.” This interactive protest project showcases 76 short stories about women who choosing to speak out about their experiences with street harassment. Read More
CNN anchor Fredricka Whitfield was joined by comedian Amanda Seales and writer Steven Santagati to respond to last week’s viral cat catcalling video. Santagati, author of The Manual: A True Bad Boy Explains How Men Think, Date, and Mate, is a self-proclaimed expert on the psychology of catcalling, so he offers gems like this: “I can’t get into a woman’s head … but I’m a guy and I know why these guys do this [...] There is nothing more that a woman loves to hear than how pretty she is. Read More
Living in a huge urban center like New York City means that catcalls and whistles, unwanted greetings and gestures, can, unfortunately, come at you any time of the day or night. Case in point: I left my bartending job at 1 pm IN THE AFTERNOON yesterday, after working an all-night rave that rendered me exhausted, voice-less and wanting to buy an apple from the corner fruit stand just to chuck it at a passing police siren. In other words, I looked rough. Read More
Yesterday, Hollaback! came out with a "Know Your Rights" guide, a comprehensive report documenting information on street harassment from 22 different countries and their local laws on street harassment. Hollaback! is a movement made up of activists around the world starting conversations about street harassment and working toward solutions for creating safer public spaces for women and LGBTQ people. Read More
I have been brainstorming for years the best way to react to catcallers, and I think Caroline Tompkins has found it. Her creative and powerful photo project titled “Hey Baby” turns the lens on her verbal assaulters. The 22-year-old art student claimed walking around her own neighborhood was unbearable and she would constantly be harassed. In taking photos of the jerks that think they are in the right, she is able to turn around and confront the situation, and say, "if you take comfort away from me, I can take comfort away from you. Read More
  I love New York. I’ve lived here my whole life, and wouldn’t trade a minute of it for anything.  That being said, there’s a lot about growing up in a big city, especially for a young woman, that’s not so great. I’m thinking particularly of street harassment—it’s something that I, along with countless others around the world, have had to deal with almost every day from a very young age. Some of my friends yell at their cat-callers, some spit at their feet. I, on the other hand, am not as inclined to such boldness. Read More
There’s a brand-new building going up in my neighborhood, about a block from my subway stop. I’m not even going to bother explaining what that means. If you're a woman, you know the deal. As I approach, I feel my shoulders rounding forward, my gait shortening and shuffling. My eyes are Super-Glued to the sidewalk. I want to hide, but I can’t get to the subway unless I go down this particular block, and here they are, and here comes the low whistle and: “Why you walking so fast, honey?” “Juicy, juicy thighs. Read More
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