Tag » history
Are we all equal in death? Apparently not. According to an article by Dana Liebelson, enticingly titled “Newspapers Don’t Care When Notable Women Die,” obituaries continue to disproportionately report the deaths of famous men as opposed to women.  This year, The Los Angeles Times featured 36 women and 114 men on their list of prominent deaths. In The Washington Post, women made up just over one third of the list. Read More
D.C. ladies, now is your chance to celebrate women who rock! The National Museum of Women in the Arts is closing its 25th Anniversary year with an awesome exhibit called “Women Who Rock: Vision, Passion, Power,” opening September 7.     The exhibit covers women in popular music from the 1920s to today, including icons like Billie Holiday, Janis Joplin, Yoko Ono, and Madonna. Visitors will see handwritten lyrics, instruments, and clothing, including Joan Jett’s electric guitar, one of Meg White’s drums, and Lady Gaga’s meat dress. Read More
If you’re into fashion blogs, you may be familiar with Rhiannon Leifheit of the wonderful, vintage-inspired "Liebemarlene." Blogging for years, she’s been featured on multiple websites and graced the pages of many magazines, including our very own back in 2008. Liebemarlene is one of the first fashion blogs I've read, and I’ve been a follower ever since. While she does post wonderful collections, outfits, and photo shoots, Leifheit also writes about a variety of other things aside from fashion. Read More
I am often baffled when I am asked, “How is it that you can be a feminist and be interested in fashion?” To that I respond, “How can I not be one?” Many people think of fashion as trivial. At times, I, too, become frustrated when I read magazines telling me how I NEED to dress if I want to be considered stylish--- I find that writing style too narrow. But still, fashion isn’t trivial at all. Fashion isn’t just about the visceral pleasure I get from wearing pins I found at garage sales or a Mod Squad dress I won in a bidding war on eBay. Read More
My inner Harriet the Spy came in handy when I was on the bus a couple of days ago, eavesdropping on a conversation between two elderly women (yeah, I know, I’m really that cool!) talking about a new exhibit that opened at the New York Public Library called “Lunch Hour NYC.” After a couple of minutes of listening to the women reminisce about how cheap food used to be “back in the golden days” when they’d hangout at diners with the waitresses on roller skates, I, myself, was nostalgic for a time I will never experience. Read More

A Piercing Matter

BY Intern Tessa in Style

I'm not a body-piercing fanatic, but I did get my nose pierced just before graduating from college, where I met and admired many hippies. Some of them had their noses pierced, and it looked beautiful on them, so I wanted to hop on the bandwagon.                   (An example of the aforementioned foxy hippies) All this got me wondering how hippies latched on to nose piercing, and I started doing some heavy Googling. Read More
It’s no secret that women are generally underrepresented in mainstream literature. But now, thanks to the fantastic site History of Nordic Women’s Literature, 1000 years worth of – you guessed it – Nordic women’s literary history is available at the touch of a button. The site, which was a joint project between the Danish Center for Information on Gender, Equality, and Ethnicity and the Swedish National Resource Library for Gender Studies, has compiled in-depth information about over 800 women writers. Read More
As Clint Eastwood's J. Edgar opens with Leonardo DiCaprio's narration, I gulp. Uh oh, Leo with an accent? This can't be good. But boy oh boy did he prove me wrong. Growing Pains star no more, DiCaprio nailed it this time, proving his absolute brilliance as an actor. Man, I feel old. While in the 30's and 40's J. Edgar Hoover, first director of the Federal Bureau of Investigations, may have appeared a badass figure to young boys looking for a hero to emulate on their cereal boxes, Hoover was indeed much more of a complicated soul and the film strips him down to the bone. Read More
A young American woman strolls down a side street of Florence, Italy.  Along the way men jeer at her, shouting crude complements in the hopes of catching her eye for just a moment.  She is unfazed outwardly, her scarf a protective shield from their world as she continues on her way.  Although this image is from 1951, it could easily have happened today.  When I first saw this picture I empathized completely with the woman, and not only because I’ve experienced being catcalled. Read More
Ever wonder how the women of yesterday got it on, on their own? Now there’s a museum solely dedicated to just that. Babeland, everyone’s favorite adult toy shop, has created their very own vintage vibrator museum. Rachel Venning, Co-founder of Babeland, got the idea to start the museum after discovering vintage vibrators while flea market shopping. Now her discoveries and more, are apart of a fully documented and exhibited online collection. Read More