Tag » history
  History usually chooses to ignore female revolutionaries who fought alongside glorified men like Che Guevara and Martin Luther King Jr. But inspirational women have been shaping our landscape throughout the course of time, and the lesser-knowns deserve some credit.  Here are ten incredible women (in no particular order) you might not be familiar with who taught us how to fight for what we believe in: 1. Celia Sanchez Most people associate the Cuban Revolution with Che Guevara and Fidel Castro. Read More
The Kardashian/Jenner Empire has taken over our celebrity culture. There is roughly no one in the United States who wouldn’t know who Kourtney, Kendall, Kylie, Khloe, and Kim are, like it or not. Yet they were not the first American celebrity family. Long before them there was another group of sisters who used their feminine assets to get famous, only in this case it was long luscious locks rather than big rear ends. Collector Weekly untangles the tale of Sarah, Victoria, Isabella, Grace, Naomi, Dora, and Mary Sutherland who came from painfully humble beginnings. Read More
Winter is here and it's a rough one. And by that we mean it is basically Frozen without the peppy soundtrack. Which makes perfect curl-up-with-a-good-book-and-drink-tea weather. Here at BUST, we have put together ten books to keep you company in this arctic tundra, because there's only so much Netflix we can handle before our eyes melt. The books range in genre, but all have one thing in common: women. Yay! These books feature ladies from all walks of life, and illustrate their struggles, successes, and historical importance. Read More
Recently CNN published a video where three women who have all accused comedian Bill Cosby of sexual assault met for the first time. Read More
In 1922, Ellen Welles Page sat down and penned a letter for the weekly New York magazine Outlook. “If one judges by appearances,” she wrote, “I suppose I am a flapper. I am within the age limit. I wear bobbed hair, the badge of flapperhood. (And oh, what a comfort it is!) I powder my nose. I spend a large amount of time in automobiles. I adore to dance.” But, she went on to explain, there was a reason why folks her age were given to frivolity. “We are the Younger Generation. The war tore away our spiritual foundations and challenged our faith. Read More
The U.S. senate gets an A+ this week for confirming former Arizona U.S. Attorney, Diane Humetewa, as the first-ever Native American woman to hold the position of Federal Judge. After winning a unanimous 96-0 vote, Humetewa is to serve on the U.S. District Court of Arizona! At present, Humetewa is the first active member of a Native American tribe (Hopi) to serve in the federal government and only the third Native American in history to do so. Read More
I have always been obsessed with the idea of growing up in a different decade. Would I still look like me? Would I still be like me? How would I dress?!   So it's no surprise that I am obsessed with Ohio State University student Annalisa Hartlaub's photo project “Counter//Culture." Hartlaub, 16, created a photo series in which she interprets styles from previous decades. Using herself as a model, Hartlaub showcases fashion from previous decades ; her trip down memory lane goes all the way back to the 1920s and lands on the modern day. Read More

Movie Review: Belle

BY BUST Magazine in Movies

Based on a true story, Belle follows 18th-century English aristocrat Dido Elizabeth Belle as she grows up, finds her place in society, and seeks a husband. The catch—Dido is black. The illegitimate daughter of a Royal Navy Admiral and an African woman, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) grows up with her blonde, blue-eyed cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), as the pair are raised by their great-uncle, Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson), and his wife (Emily Watson). Though she is cultured, educated, and beloved by her family, Dido inhabits a strange in-between place in her household. Read More
  When we think of beauty pageants, we think of doe eyes, blond ringlets, and tiny waists; the bizarre ritual of choosing the most beautiful woman in the room seems antiquated and oppressive. But it turns out that prior to Women’s Liberation, pageantry was an even more surreal and shocking part of the American experience, and the queens provide insight into their contemporary social and political climate, cataloging the strange ways in which women were expected to express Western ideals of feminine beauty and grace. Read More
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