Tag » girls
    Recently, NYC subway stops and bus shelters have been plastered with the faces of little girls in all their smiling glory. Printed over the image of each girl is the headline "I'm a Girl" and then, smaller, "I'm Beautiful the Way I am." In between those lines are listed the various ways that the girl is "beautiful": "I'm a leader, adventurous, outgoing, sporty, unique, smart and strong," for instance. Read More
  The Abercrombie brand has been suffering lately, big time. In addition to being what the analyst Richard Jafffe calls “a stale brand” that is incapable of competing with trendier companies, the company, led by CEO Mike Jeffies, has been pretty sexist in their marketing strategies. Girls are taking note; no one wants to buy clothes from a company that sexualizes young girls and “hates fat chicks. Read More
  Happy Hallow's Eve's Eve, BUSTies! As another year comes to a close we don our carefully crafted outfits and munch on yummy candy, new controversies erupt over what costumes are socially acceptable or too revealing. And a lot of times, these conversations revolve around what women are entitled to wear. So before you head out tomorrow, take a listen to this awesome slam poetry from Washington D.C’s Brave New Voices Grand Slam Finals 2013. Because despite how we feel about barely-there costumes and the like, we women are all in this together. Read More
  In 1865, Mark Twain wrote a picture book entitled “Advice To Little Girls.” The book is delightfully illustrated by Vladimir Radunsky, who whimsically juxtaposes doodles that you might expect in a child’s diary with rich watercolor-esque renderings of the human form. Infused with this sketchbook-inspired world, are powerful and progressive life lessons for girls. Read More
In a new essay for an upcoming issue of The New Yorker, funny lady Lena Dunham writes about her childhood fondness for ordering takeout, as well as the recent loss of a family friend. While the topics of death and delivery don’t explicitly overlap in the article, both provoke different feelings of nostalgia in Dunham, whose essay, though tinged with familiar humor, is generally quite sensitive. Read More