Tag » gender
You’ve got questions: He’s got answers. Changing your gender takes balls, ones you might not’ve been born with. And as Chris Edwards will tell you, if you’re gonna do it in front of family, friends, and a few hundred coworkers, you better have a pretty big set. When he openly began his transition from female to male back in 1995, the word transgender didn’t exist. Now it’s everywhere–including the cover of Time. Naturally, people are curious, so we asked Chris to give us the answers to the questions he’s asked most often. Read More
Roughly 40 years ago, the U.S. education system took a major step towards equality: We're talking Title IX, the amendment specifying that any educational program receiving funds from the federal government cannot discriminate against, deny, or judge a U.S. citizen on the basis of their sex. Because of this, women have been allowed more representation in sports, the sciences, and technical schools. However, gender barriers still exist today and so does the association between testosterone and contact sports—but we didn’t need to tell you that. Read More
Cannes Lions is fighting gender discrimination with its new award, the Glass Lion: The Lion for Change. The Glass Lion was created with support from LeanIn.Org, and recognizes work that challenges gender bias and stereotypes about men and women in marketing media. The decision to launch this award was fueled by the festival’s belief that images in marketing play a huge role in shaping our culture. Read More
The daily life of an unemployed person in America primarily involves searching for work, personal care, and leisure activities. This New York Times infographic shows the amount of time spent on a certain activity for men and women in their mid-20’s to early 50’s, and reveals just how gendered some activities still are. Maroon signifies housework, beige signifies caring for others, dark and light blue signify leisure time, and yellow signifies education. Read More
In Afghanistan, where having a son is vital for any respectable family, little girls are sometimes disguised and raised as boys.  Here, journalist Jenny Nordberg investigates this complicated cultural game of hidden identity. One of the eager-looking twins nods to reaffirm her words. Then she turns to her sister. She agrees. Yes, it is true. She can confirm it.fgha They are two 10-year-old identical girls, each with black hair, squirrel eyes, and a few small freckles. We are sitting on a gold-embroidered sofa in their home in Kabul, Afghanistan. Read More
Check out the new trailer from reporters Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn's three-part documentary series, A Path Appears, premiering in January 2015 on PBS. The inspiring series will provide a voice for women around the world facing gender-based oppression and explore solutions to widespread social ills. Read More
When I started reading an article on New Statesman by Sarah Ditum (“Why we shouldn’t rebrand prostitution as ‘sex work’”), I was so ready to pounce with all my counter arguments in favor of using “sex work.” The word “prostitution” is archaic and harmful and all that bad stuff. Ditum was prompted to write this piece by a recent push to replace “prostitute” with “sex worker” in the 2015 Associated Press Stylebook. Read More
Throwing Shade is the kind of podcast you would make with your best friend. Just like how Broad City portrays Abbi and Ilana's friendship so perfectly that you feel like you and your friend ARE Abbi and Ilana, Throwing Shade is like you and your friend but even wittier, and with microphones. Self-described "feminasty" Erin Gibson and "homosensual" Bryan Safi met at UCB LA but really clicked when they were both writing for Current TV, where Erin hosted "Modern Lady" and where I first watched Bryan Safi hosting "That's Gay. Read More
In Afghanistan, where having a son is vital for any respectable family, little girls are sometimes disguised and raised as boys. Here, journalist Jenny Nordberg investigates this complicated cultural game of hidden identity   “Our brother is really a girl.” One of the eager-looking twins nods to reaffirm her words. Then she turns to her sister. She agrees. Yes, it is true. She can confirm it. They are two 10-year-old identical girls, each with black hair, squirrel eyes, and a few small freckles. We are sitting on a gold-embroidered sofa in their home in Kabul, Afghanistan. Read More
Vivian Fu is a San Francisco based, San Fernando Valley raised photographer pushing the limits, shattering boundaries, and taking names. She earned her B.A. in Fine Arts with an emphasis on photography at the University of California, Santa Cruz in 2012, and has since been creating an incredible body of work exploring identity, delving into her own experiences as an Asian American woman and working with her body and her relationships. Read More
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