Tag » film review
In November I responded to one of Seth Rogen’s tweets that invited fans to watch his latest comedy “The Interview” with him over beer and popcorn. Rogen, beer, and popcorn all sounded like a good time to me, so needless to say- I was in. I didn’t know at the time that I would be watching a movie that would then be cancelled from theaters all over the country with Sony Pictures shelving its release entirely over a series of threats from Internet hackers. Read More
Lifelong best friends Tara Karsian and Andrea Grano, the writers and producers of this first independent film, came up with the idea for BFFs accidentally, when Grano asked Karsian "What if you realized how in love with me you are?" This wonderful accident turned into a feature film about two friends who blur the lines of friendship and relationship.  The film follows best friends Kat (Karsian) and Sam (Grano) who pretend to be lovers to go on a weekend couples retreat. Read More
Violette, the latest film by Martin Provost, stars the brilliant Emmanuelle Devos as revolutionary feminist author Violette Leduc, and Sandrine Kiberlain as the infamous writer and social theorist, Simone de Beauvoir. Presented by Adopt Films, the drama delves into the complexities and at times, emotional turmoil, of Leduc. The film captures her fascination and intense attachment for de Beauvoir, and the conviction de Beauvoir feels to share her unrivaled honesty with the literary world. The film is split into chapters, and it certainly reads like a novel. Read More
There is no denying that food and health documentaries are big right now. The success of films like Food, Inc., Forks Over Knives, and Killer at Large have proven how science and nutrition can make it big at the box office. The market has been saturated. So why then would a heavy hitter like Katie Couric spearhead yet another one of these films? The answer is clearly there in the film. Fed Up is a passion project from a group of concerned women fearfully anticipating that this generation will be the first where the children are not expected to live longer lives than their parents. Read More

Movie Review: Belle

BY BUST Magazine in Movies

Based on a true story, Belle follows 18th-century English aristocrat Dido Elizabeth Belle as she grows up, finds her place in society, and seeks a husband. The catch—Dido is black. The illegitimate daughter of a Royal Navy Admiral and an African woman, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) grows up with her blonde, blue-eyed cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), as the pair are raised by their great-uncle, Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson), and his wife (Emily Watson). Though she is cultured, educated, and beloved by her family, Dido inhabits a strange in-between place in her household. Read More
Jonathan Glazer’s sci-fi thriller is based on Michael Faber’s 2000 novel, but the two have little in common besides the title and the most basic premise: an alien (Scarlett Johansson) disguises herself as a human and lures unsuspecting men into her trap. Glazer’s film never quite makes it clear why the aliens want the men, who are trapped in a strange, amniotic fluid-like substance until their bodies dissolve; in Faber’s novel, the reason is eventually made explicit: the aliens eat humans. Read More
The Source is a fascinating new interview series designed and executed by celebrated artist Doug Aitken. Aitken artfully presents intimate and revealing interviews that give the audience a new lens through which to view the creative artists we are so familiar seeing, bringing attention to the lesser-seen process of creativity. I first heard about the project at the Sundance Film festival, which is part of the New Frontier program. At Sundance, The installation was constructed inside of a custom built, 2,000-square-feet, circular structure called the Pavilion. Read More
  Wadjda (Waad Mohammed) is a straight-up badass. Under her traditional Saudi Arabian garb, the 10-year-old girl rocks Chuck Taylors, and her cassette player (yeah, she's that cool) screams indie rock from Grouplove.  All Wadjda wants is a bike, so she can race her friend Abdullah (Abdullrahman Al Gohandi), a boy from the neighborhood. Despite being constantly reminded that "girls don't ride bikes," Wadjda hustles money left and right, and is so determined that she enters a religious contest in her school where the prize is enough cash to make her dream a reality. Read More

Movie Review: Starlet

BY Amy Bucknam in Movies

  Two women find unlikely friendship through a series of random events in Sean Baker’s film Starlet. Jane (Dree Hemingway) is a very thin, blond 21-year-old with a carefree attitude and a provocative lifestyle.  The story begins when Jane buys a thermos containing $10,000 at the yard sale of an older woman in her eighties, Sadie (Besedka Johnson). Read More
Tiffany Shlain, the filmmaker who brought us reproductive rights documentary Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness and explored American Jewish identity via Barbie dolls in The Tribe, is back with Connected: An Autoblogography About Life, Death, and Technology. Read More
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