Tag » feminist film
We interviewed Gillian Robespierre and Elisabeth Holm, the writer/director of Obvious Child, a film about much more than abortion stigma. This new modern-day, feminist flick not only reconstitutes the traditional rom-com, but its underrated content has also sparked the kind of movement and dialogue we've all been waiting for.  If you haven't seen the film, there ARE spoilers in this interview, so beware. Read More

Movie Review: Belle

BY BUST Magazine in Movies

Based on a true story, Belle follows 18th-century English aristocrat Dido Elizabeth Belle as she grows up, finds her place in society, and seeks a husband. The catch—Dido is black. The illegitimate daughter of a Royal Navy Admiral and an African woman, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) grows up with her blonde, blue-eyed cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), as the pair are raised by their great-uncle, Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson), and his wife (Emily Watson). Though she is cultured, educated, and beloved by her family, Dido inhabits a strange in-between place in her household. Read More
  Listen up, marshmallows – the good news about the Veronica Mars movie just keeps rolling in, and we couldn’t be more excited. To catch you up on a little VMars history, the brilliant series was on air from 2004 to 2007, starring Kristen Bell as a feminist heroine who kicked major ass and addressed her own vulnerability in equal parts.      The show had everything: a tightly plotted mystery, the sluethiest, snarkiest scenes, incomparable amounts of heart, and a love (LOgan/VEronica) story for the ages. Read More
You know his voice. As the lights dim leisurely, as you reach for your second handful of perfectly salted popcorn, as you are beseeched, repeatedly, to please silence your phones – you hear his familiar intonations greet your ears hello. And yet, why is the narrator always a he? The trailer for Lake Bell’s In A World... is finally out (we’ve been excited about this for a while; refer back to 10 Must-See Lady-Friendly Summer Flicks)! The movie, which the multitalented Bell wrote and directed, explores why film preview voice-overs are perpetually male. Read More
  The phrase “Let’s not get caught” has never held so much weight as it does in the final scene of Thelma & Louise. No matter how many times I’ve seen it (a lot), I still get chills. Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis are just SO DANG good, and talk about a feminist classic. The film turns 20 (!!) this year which means New Yorkers and Los Angelenos have a chance to not only see it on the big screen at special showings, but also to hear discussions about its impact from a panel of cool ladies in the industry (N.Y.C.) and the cast and crew themselves (L.A.). Read More