Tag » female superheroes
Okay, this isn’t a new conversation. I think a lot of us are on the same page about the sexism of superhero movies. If a superhero movie features a woman, she’s usually cast as someone that needs to be saved or a romantic distraction to the male lead. If she has a more dynamic role, as either a hero herself or a villain, more often than not, she’s dressed in some pretty impractical spandex or leather. Read More
As far as we’ve come with female superheroes in films, their portrayal continues to disappoint.  Hillary Pennell and Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz at the University of Missouri conducted a study recently that shows how even the new super-empowered heroes may lower women’s self esteem.  Pennell and Behm-Morawitz showed undergraduate women scenes from two popular superhero film series, Spider-Man and X-Men. The female characters shown from Spider-Man were all victims. The female characters shown from X-Men were heroines. However, females from both series were highly sexualized. Read More
Great news: The A-Force, an all-female Avengers, will be arriving on graphic novel pages near you this spring. Writers G. Willow Wilson and Marguerite Bennet have stepped up to the task of creating a promising new team of woman heroes with Jorge Molina behind the art for the series. The all-female team, which will be the fifteenth of its kind in Marvel history, is mostly comprised of kickass supers from different sects of the Marvel Universe, including the popular Ms. Marvel, Storm, and She-Hulk. Read More
2014 was, by most accounts, a pretty rad year for the ladies in the crowd. Politically, we’ve got more woman than ever before in Congress (100 to be exact), the first African-American Republican Congresswoman,  and a blatant smack down of  extreme anti-abortion laws. Women have thoroughly flexed their social media muscles, creating trending hashtags like #YesAllWomen, #WhyIStayed and #WhyILeft that united women and allies against violence, misogyny and sexism. Read More
What’s more kickass than a female superhero? A queer female superhero. The Soska Sisters (twin sisters who are known for making super rad female-focused horror films like American Mary) are set to direct the movie that will bring Jimmy Palmiotti and Joe Quesada’s Painkiller Jane to life. Painkiller Jane is a comic from the '90s that focuses on a bisexual cop-turned-superhero with special healing and regenerative powers. She’s a woman, she’s queer, and she’s indestructible. Read More
Wonder Woman pretty much epitomizes the ‘strong, female character’ that is sadly rare in current media. She battles bad guys (and gals), she is confident, and she is a powerful person. Basically, she is a wonderful feminist role model.  Or not.  David Finch, the artist who is taking over the drawing of the DC Comics hero, recently said that he wants the heretofore feminist icon to be “strong.”  But “feminist”?  That’s going a bit too far for him. Read More
Kate Beaton is a Canadian comics artist and the creator of “Hark! A Vagrant,” a hilarious history inspired comic strip.  Some of her feminism-based comic strips include “Strong Female Characters 1 and 2,” which stars Georgia O’Queefe, Susan B. Assthony, and Queen Elizatits, 3 empowered superheroes who are “Fighter Pilots.  Feminists.  Friends.”  (As well as proud members of the Mile High Club!)  Together, the 3 battle stereotypes, eat cookies, and argue for the appropriateness of their superhero outfits. Read More
  Award-winning author, renowned poet and civil rights activist Dr. Maya Angelou died this morning at the age of 86, but girl, did she live a full life. The way that Dr. Angelou's life overflowed with incredible achievements and wisdom is not just admired by all, but her unwavering dedication to helping others will forever be appreciated. As will her perseverance during the toughest of times. Angelou's long and honorable journey devoted to social justice through activism, education, and the arts is an inspiration to all. Read More
In the past decade, we have seen many of our favorite childhood superheroes come to life on the big screen: the victorious Superman, the conflicted Batman, the unpredictable Hulk, the suave Iron Man. So where are the women? Sure, Black Widow made an appearance in The Avengers and Catwoman (my personal favorite) showed up to save the Dark Knight, but most films are uncomfortably lacking in women characters with fully explored, complex identities. Well, all that might change in the upcoming Superman vs. Batman film, starring Henry Cavill and Ben Affleck, respectively. Read More