Tag » female athletes
Roughly 40 years ago, the U.S. education system took a major step towards equality: We're talking Title IX, the amendment specifying that any educational program receiving funds from the federal government cannot discriminate against, deny, or judge a U.S. citizen on the basis of their sex. Because of this, women have been allowed more representation in sports, the sciences, and technical schools. However, gender barriers still exist today and so does the association between testosterone and contact sports—but we didn’t need to tell you that. Read More
Excited to host the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi over the next weeks, the Russian team released a new campaign consisting of photographs meant to entice viewers with only the "most photogenic" female athletes. The message? Our women are hot, so you should watch. As reported by Policy Mic’s Matt Essert, the Russian team released the images to challenge the idea that women athletes can’t be sexy and “feminine;” rather than kissing their guns, they display their dewey flesh and erect nipples. Read More
  Tatyana McFadden spent much of her childhood in a St. Petersburg orphanage where she did not receive adequate medical attention for her spina bifida, a condition which paralyzed her from the waist downwards. Without access to a wheelchair, she learned to walk on her hands, an experience which she now tells The New York Times taught her “as much about finding mental strength as physical strength [and] may have helped my arms and shoulders [and] it also taught me that I was always going to find a way to do something. Read More
After winning gold medals in the World Track and Field Championship in Moscow, Russian athletes, Kseniya Ryzhova and Tatyana Firova, kissed on the winners podium. However, Russian officials have been speculating if the kiss was just plain ‘ole sportsmanship, or “gay propaganda.” Once the two won the 4x400 relay, photos of Ryzhova and Firova showed them hugging and pecking on the track. But the runners made heads turn after kissing on the winner’s podium. Read More
"Icons. Rivals. Champions. Sisters." The world knows Venus and Serena Williams as the sister act that forever changed tennis, swatting away stereotypes and smashing their way to the top of the rubber-soled crop. But this documentary gives us an intimate and honest look at these women like you've never seen them before! It features in-depth interviews with Bill Clinton, Chris Rock, Anna Wintour, and more. And as if all that's not compelling enough, Wyclef Jean lends original tunes to the movie's soundtrack! We love. Read More
The London Olympics will perhaps always be remembered for its record-breaking feats and for its historically –based opening ceremony (give Britain a break for its industrial revolution skit, it's really hard to be the following act to Beijing). Read More
Though it's long overdue, this week we can celebrate the announcement that, after years of international pressure, Saudi Arabia will most likely send female athletes to the 2012 Olympic games in London. Furthermore, a female Saudi Arabian sports commentator, Reema Abdullah, revealed that she'll get to carry the Olympic torch. Saudi Arabia, which has never sent women to the Olympics, met with the International Olympics Committee (IOC) last week to present a list of potential female athletes. Read More
Thirteen years ago today, the Women’s National Basketball Association began its very first season.   The inaugural game--in which the New York Liberty defeated the Los Angeles Sparks 67-57-- was nationally televised on NBC with over 14 thousand people watching from the stands.  The league started out with eight teams but had doubled in size by the early 2000s. In 2006, it became the first team-oriented women’s professional sports league to survive ten consecutive seasons (which is truly quite sad). Read More
    The word 'superwoman' is thrown around way too often, but here's an athlete who completely deserves the description. Amy Palmiero-Winters is a 37-year-old mother of two, coach, mentor, and became a below-the-knee amputee as the result of a motorcycle accident in 1994. Now, she's made history.On January 1st, she became the first female athlete with a prosthetic leg to win the title in a race. And it wasn't any old race either.  Starting at 9 a.m. on December 31, 2009 and finishing at 9 a.m. Read More