Tag » female directors
Early last week, I had the pleasure of speaking with Brooklyn-based indie filmmakers Rémy Bennett and Émilie Richard-Froozan, the BFF directors behind the upcoming film Buttercup Bill. The film can best be described as a dream sequence, a vibrant story of two childhood friends, Patrick and Pernilla, more akin to siblings separated at birth, who reunite after a tragedy. “The genre is doomed love,” Rémy told me, “like people who have this electricity and chemistry but it just doesn’t work out. Read More
Rocks in My Pockets is an animated movie for adults that poses the question, “How do you stay sane in this crazy world?”  While this particular line of thinking is nothing new, the film, funded by over 800 Kickstarter contributions, searches for answers via five women and their personal battles with depression and suicide. Read More
Summer is the perfect time for movie theater refuge. When your air-conditioning cruelly breaks in the middle of a heat wave, there is nothing better than fleeing to the movies to watch March of the Penguins (or was that just me?) However, The Wrap has revealed that out of 39 movies being released this summer, only one, Jupiter Down, is directed by a woman. Excuse me, CO-DIRECTED by a woman, Lana Wachowski with her brother, Andy. Read More
Earlier this week, I had the pleasure of interviewing writer/director Jill Soloway, whose first feature film, Afternoon Delight, is set for release today (A.K.A. we just made your weekend plans for you). The 47- year-old writer, former showrunner, and BUST contributor is a serious feminist inspiration. Afternoon Delight showcases the life and self-realization of a Los Angeles mother named Rachel (Kathryn Hahn). Read More
While Diablo Cody’s known for writing Juno, Jennifer's Body and Young Adult, Paradise is her first feature film that she’s written and directed! The film stars Julianne Hough, in which she transitions from a “good girl” to “bad girl,” after surviving a plane crash. She starts to re-examine her life by challenging her religion, and even declares in her church that she might vote Democrat in the next election. Read More
  At a time when most loyal moviegoers are either Latin American or female (or both), it’s taken a hell of a while for the film industry to catch up with the changing scene. This week, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) released its star-studded list of invited members, and they’ve made some improvement from last year. Those who accept membership make up the elite class of film industry pros that decides who gets Oscars next year. Out of the 276 invitees, 31 percent are women—an increase from last year’s 28 percent. Read More
Women have always been unrepresented in the creation of film and media. In fact, in the past 85 years, women directors have only been nominated for an Oscar four times. Fandor, an independent film streaming service, has recently put together an infographic that reveals the extent of Hollywood’s current challenge: the lack of women directors.  Mira Nair on the set of Mississippi Masala Check out the infographic below which shows the true statistics of female directors in Hollywood as well as women’s recent successes in independent film. Read More
Fractured fairy tales have dominated this year’s box office, but most of the stories are pretty far removed from the real world. Enter The Brass Teapot, a topical spin on this formula that follows neither witch hunters nor giant slayers, but a couple of broke kids. Married protagonists Alice (Juno Temple) and John (Michael Angarano) find a shady solution to their debt in a teapot that responds to pain by filling itself with cash. It’s not long before the two use sadomasochism, body modification, and plenty of slapstick to amass themselves a fortune. Read More
Amy Heckerling is the greatest. Not only is she responsible for national treasures like Clueless (1995) and Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982), but she is one of the few female directors working in Hollywood, period. As an aspiring movie-maker, her awesomely quirky comedies give me a reason to get up in the morning. So when I saw that the trailer for her new movie Vamps (2012) had been released, I flipped out. Read More
Alison Klayman is 27 years old. She's graduated from Brown University, written for NPR, moved to China and made a feature length documentary. Oh, and she won the Sundance Special Jury Prize this past January. I, for one, feel like a slacker compared to the multi-hyphenated journalist.  Klayman's award winning film Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry hit theaters last week on July 27 via IFC Films. The 27-year-old spent years with her subject  Weiwei, 54, trying to get the full story on one of China's most controversial art and social activists. Read More