Tag » domestic violence
When I heard about Flavia Carvalho and her Projeto A Pele da Flor (The Skin of the Flower Project), I immediately knew I wanted to write about her. I have two very large scars on my body, one down my chest and the other across my back. Luckily, I’ve never felt too much shame around them, but all of my life, people have been eager to ask me questions about them, forcing me to recount their back stories. In some ways, I understand the questions; it’s natural to be curious about things that appear so unnatural. Read More
  At the end of September this year, a young woman in Arkansas posted a handful of photos onto Snapchat. In one photo, the young woman is smiling while her boyfriend points a gun at the back of her head. Another photo shows the same gun lying on the floor next to a small pile of ammunition. There is another photo of the couple, a selfie, again posing with the gun. Later that night, that woman was shot dead by her boyfriend. Read More
“Your words of comfort conveyed a message that someone who likes you might hurt you,” Merritt Smith wrote on a now-viral Facebook post this week. The post was written in response to a member of staff at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Colombus, Ohio, who had told her four-year-old daughter that the boy who hit her probably had a crush on her.  The boy had hit her so hard she required stitches. Maybe this is a stretch. A far reach. Read More
“In this series you will see one woman, an average young professional, depicted in routine daily situations. The concept of male entitlement is represented by male arms and hands performing a variety of actions that are overwhelming intrusive on her body and her life,” says photographer Allaire Bartell on her photo series, “Boundaries.” In each shocking image, it’s evident that “oppression of women does not just occur in extreme isolated incidents (violent rape and physical abuse) but can also be felt in lesser forms during the day to day. Read More
"More than 300 women have been shot, stabbed, strangled, beaten, bludgeoned or burned to death by men in South Carolina over the past decade, dying at a rate of one every 12 days while the state does little to stem the carnage from domestic abuse," reads Till Death Do Us Part's description.  Till Death Do Us Part—a Post and Courier photo series that took place over eight months—won the Pulitzer Prize for its outstanding work this week. Read More