Tag » comics
At this year's Comic-Con, women aren't just dressing up as characters from their favorite movies and TV shows, like Inside Out—they're leading and speaking on panels and taking the reins with their version of feminist fandom. “It’s a newly visible thing,” Sam Maggs stated in an after panel interview. The panel, “Nobody’s Damsel: Writing for Tomorrow’s Women,” discussed the role women play in entertainment and how future writers, actors, and producers “can create characters that are relatable to the upcoming generation of women. Read More
Now that affirmative consent is moving beyond college campuses and entering the national conversation, people are becoming concerned about its potential conversations. Read More
Okay, this isn’t a new conversation. I think a lot of us are on the same page about the sexism of superhero movies. If a superhero movie features a woman, she’s usually cast as someone that needs to be saved or a romantic distraction to the male lead. If she has a more dynamic role, as either a hero herself or a villain, more often than not, she’s dressed in some pretty impractical spandex or leather. Read More
As far as we’ve come with female superheroes in films, their portrayal continues to disappoint.  Hillary Pennell and Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz at the University of Missouri conducted a study recently that shows how even the new super-empowered heroes may lower women’s self esteem.  Pennell and Behm-Morawitz showed undergraduate women scenes from two popular superhero film series, Spider-Man and X-Men. The female characters shown from Spider-Man were all victims. The female characters shown from X-Men were heroines. However, females from both series were highly sexualized. Read More
D.C. has the unparalleled job of publishing "comic books about the greatest heroes in the world, and the most evil villains imaginable" so it makes sense that infamous T. Joker is being honored with re-envisioned covers in celebration of his birthday, but—much like in Gotham—chaos has reared its ugly head. Spurred by one of the variant covers intended for release in June, readers are reacting strongly to an option for Issue #41's cover art, which depicts the revamped, stronger-than-ever Batgirl as Joker's teary-eyed victim. Read More