Tag » book review
This is the story of a Palestinian family in Gaza coping with the hell of living in a warzone. The book is informative, exciting, and thorough—all you have to do is get through the first 60 cumbersome pages, and then the story flies along until the end. Dabbagh’s main characters are 27-year-old Iman and her twin brother Rashid, and their story opens with a bombing raid. While Rashid is hanging out on his roof, stoned out of his mind and welcoming death, Iman is camped out in a basement with an activist group called the Women’s Committee, trying to find a solution to the war. Read More
In Marbles, cartoonist Ellen Forney’s life-altering journey though mental illness is graphically exposed in more ways than one. The Forney we see at the start of the story is experiencing her most sexual, creative, and manic period, which is followed by a big crash that leads to her bipolar diagnosis at 30. Here, her story evolves into the struggle not only to come to terms with medicating herself, but also to find the right formula of medications that will get her back to her life. This excruciating and lonely process takes four years, even with the help of her omnipresent shrink. Read More
In 1980s Romania, Carmen Bugan’s father wrote anti-Communist propaganda, an illegal act that led to the family having to flee the country in 1989. But of course, as a kid, Bugan had no idea what was going on. It wasn’t until she started searching for answers as an adult that she learned of her father’s secret. This is the retelling of her discovery. Bugan uses short, concise sentences that pack in all the emotional details of her unusual childhood as if she’s still experiencing them today. Read More
News junkies and fans of Hanna Rosin will surely remember “The End of Men,” her 2010 Atlantic article about female success and how it relates to the simultaneous plummeting of male accomplishment. Her engrossing new book retains that provocative title and expounds on the facts she uncovered in her first go-round. Rosin focuses mostly on the shifting of familial responsibilities and career achievements between men and women by examining statistics and conducting interviews. Read More
  "This animal is quite harmless if not touched!" -- "Muzzle or no muzzle, jabber she will!" A picture's worth a thousand words, and the illustrations on postcards say a lot about the time that they were created. For example, it's easy to see from the women wearing muzzles postcards (did I just type "women wearing muzzles"?!) above that whatever time period they came about in, it was an important one for women's rights. Read More
  If you need to fall in love with reading again – or just want a reminder that high school students deserve a lot more than their reading lists give them – then The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2012 is the book for you. The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2012 is a compilation of literature selected by high school students and edited by Dave Eggers. A new edition has been released every year since 2002, each containing writing selected by a team of high school students. And these kids know how to find great writing. Read More
Literature about oppression and social injustice usually sounds more interesting than it reads—and it doesn’t help that self-righteous activists make themselves redundant through repetition. Thankfully, in The Meaning of Freedom and Other Difficult Dialogues, famed activist Angela Y. Davis proves that it’s still possible to find a new, refreshing way to discuss race, gender, class, and sexuality. Read More
When I chose the awesome-looking craft book Star Wars Origami to review, I squealed like a Jawa on the wrong end of a blaster. I’ve been a Star Wars fan since I was a toddler (thanks, parents!), and although no origami expert, I have fond memories of making dozens of paper cats and frogs as a kid. I figured Chris Alexander's Star Wars Origami would be much the same: follow the instructions carefully, fold the paper, and — ta-da! — you have something amazing.  Unfortunately, I was wrong. Read More
  Here at BUST, we are all women in journalism. As an experienced intern with a journalism degree, I’m used to seeing both classrooms and newsrooms full of driven, talented women. It seems only natural that I–and my female classmates and co-workers–belong in this field: we’re ambitious, capable, and damn good at what we do. It’s startling to realize that it would have been near-impossible for young women like us to break into journalism in the 60s or 70s.  Until the 1970s, rampant discrimination kept women out of the newsroom. Read More
  If you’re a Zadie Smith fan, you’ve been waiting seven years for her latest novel, NW. If you’re not a Zadie Smith fan, NW may turn you into one.  NW stands for northwest — northwest London, specifically Willesden, Smith’s hometown and the setting of her first novel, White Teeth.  We follow the interlocking lives of four thirty-something Londoners as they try to escape the council estate (in American: housing projects) of their childhood. Read More