Tag » body positivity
“We are at our most courageous when we are willing to dive, head first, into that genuine intimacy.” The idea of being naked and frolicking through the woods covered in only moss, bark, and body paint sounds beautiful in nature but terrifying in reality. Women are usually terrified of the idea of being caught on camera completely naked, models and playboy bunnies excluded. That’s why it’s so amazing to see 10 women of all shapes and sizes strip down and come together to spread the message of self-acceptance and love. Read More
Writing good poetry requires talent, but being able to deliver at Poetry Slams and bring people to tears is another thing entirely. A performance done by a woman named Samantha Peterson called “Dead Men Can’t Catcall” is floating around the web right now among my friends. After hearing the title, I knew I had to watch and share it. She performed this piece at CUPSI (College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational) this year at Finals. Read More
When Brooke Birmingham, the blogger behind Brooke: Not On A Diet, was approached by Shape magazine to be part of what they referred to as a weight loss “success story," she saw it as an opportunity to “reach people.” Birmingham, who recently lost 172 pounds, has committed herself to spreading positivity and encouraging diverse women to embrace and love their bodies; in accordance with her convictions, Birmingham proudly wore a bikini while modeling for the photograph she later submitted to Shape. Read More
At the Ms. Foundation Women of Vision Gala, the lovely Gabourey Sidibe gave a kick-ass speech about cookies, confidence, bullying, and being an asshole. God, I love her. Sidibe recounts how hard it was to get bullied at school and at home, but remains grateful to the haters for making her stronger, finding her beauty, and being funny as hell. Still, the hate doesn’t stop. Sidibe is constantly the target of racism and sizeism for being a black, fat woman who refuses to hide.  “It's not easy. Read More
Today is International No Diet Day and women around the world are thinking, "but I really just need to lose ten pounds."But here's the thing: you really don't, because losing ten pounds will not make you more successful, it will not suddenly make the world a better place, it will not make you smarter or more valuable to society, and it will not suddenly convince you to love yourself unconditionally, because I am willing to bet some dollars that after you lose ten pounds, you will want to lose five more. Read More
Warning: This post may not be safe for work. “Scars, rolls, bones, big or small breasts, wrinkles all tell a story,” says the photographer Jade Beall. Last summer, we featured Ashlee Wells Jackson’s remarkable and powerful series of photographs celebrating the post-pregnancy bodies of a diverse group of women; Beall does something similar in her new book A Beautiful Body Project: The Bodies of Mothers. Read More
The pin-up girl occupies a unique space in feminist history; influenced in no small part by aesthetics of Burlesque, the cheesecake images have been labeled everything from “subversive” to “wholesome.” In some ways, the pin-up was the first mass-produced female icon celebrated for her sexuality, taking the place of the more demure, pious upper-middle class ideal of Victorian womanhood.    But the pin-up, like all commercial images of the female body, could be objectifying and limiting in that it pressured women to conform to a rigid standard of beauty. Read More
Warning: This post may not be safe for work. Images of idealized beauty permeate most of the media we consume, and it has for hundreds of years; throughout decades dominated by shifting aesthetics and beauty standards, the idea of the attractive female has taken numerous forms. Titian’s reclining Venus, for example, is shaped differently from the fashion models of today’s ad campaigns, and African diasporic art offers yet another ideal. More often than not, women who don't fit the mould of the day are excluded, judged, and made to feel less-than. Read More
I don't know about you, but I had to learn the ins-and-outs of sex from my somehow more knowledgeable buddies at a 6th grade cafeteria table. We had all seen the video about puberty, and we were not as totally freaked out when hair grew in weird places, or when we started to smell like B.O, but we were left to our own devices to navigate our complicated and confusing sexual feelings. The best resources I had at the age of 12 were books my mom bought me about my changing body, since the internet was not yet the sanctuary for embarrassing questions that is it today. Read More
Warning: This post may not be safe for work. The artist’s Maria Raquel Cochez’s impressive body of work is powerfully autobiographical, cataloging her painful struggle with eating disorders, weight loss surgery, and recovery. In her recent photographs, she claims the human right to accept and love her body, promoting body acceptance for all women in the process. Read More
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