Tag » body image
  Barbie has made headlines that lately; as we continue to push toy companies towards a doll that includes more diverse body types, ethnicities, careers, and lifestyles, some groundbreaking artists have reworked and re-appropriated the toy to challenge expectations and sexist assumptions. My personal favorite of these artists, Margaux Lange, shared a recent Barbie tidbit with her social media network this morning: the doll is going to be featured in the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue. Read More
The photographer Stephanie Diani, whose exquisite series on burlesque dancers captivated us, is also the force behind Tribe of Impossible Perfection, a body of work comprising a rich collection of photographs illustrating the personal and cultural significance of body image. For each portrait, she invited a sitter to divulge their thoughts on their own bodies, asking, “If you could change anything about yourself, what would it be?” As they dictated, a plastic surgeon etched pre-surgical lines on their skin in marker. Read More
An online petition for Disney to feature their first plus-sized female protagonist has been created by Virginia high school student, Jewel Moore. On Change.org, she explains: “I made this petition because I’m a plus-size young woman, and I know many plus sized girls and women who struggle with confidence and need a positive plus-size character in the media. Read More
Attention ladies of the world! The time has come to start using that hot wax for aromatherapy candles and those razors for Sweeney Todd productions! Pubic hair removal is a thing of the past! At least that's what a new study from British pharmaceutical group UK Medix is telling me.  According to their statistics, 51% of women (out of 1,870 surveyed) "do not style or groom their pubic hair." 45% of these women attribute ditching the Sally Hansen to the simple fact that they can "no longer be bothered" with the annoyances of grooming. Read More
It was just last week that good ol' Chip Wilson made some pretty brainless comments about how Lululemon's products are "not for everybody." Essentially, he told anyone over a size 0 to GTFO of his store.  Now it's damage control central over at Lululemon, and Chip wants you to know it's all his fault. He released a video via Lulu's Facebook page on Friday afternoon. Here's his statement in its entirety: "Hello, I’m Chip Wilson. I’m founder of Lululemon athletica. Read More
Eliezer Álvarez, owner of a small mannequin factory in Valencia, Venezuela, has created the kind of woman he believes the public desires—one with, as the New York Times reports, “a bulging bosom and cantilevered buttocks, a wasp waist and long legs, a fiberglass fantasy, Venezuelan style.” With the introduction of his new mannequins, Álvarez witnessed an incredible surge in sales, and now, these horribly inaccurate portrayals of the female body are the standard across most Venezuelan stores. Read More
Suddenly, the internet seems to be running rampant with debates over the notorious "thigh gap." Tumblr is full of "how-to"'s that will guide you to supposed perfection, a Twitter hashtag explodes with a plethora of new 140-character musings each second, and now even models can't escape ridicule if their thighs aren't in possession (or lack thereof) of the perfect amount of flesh.  In case you are just tuning in, a "thigh gap" is a triangular area at the top of the thighs where the skin does not touch, even when one is standing with their feet together. Read More
According to a recent study done by British plus-sized retailer Littlewoods, 74% of women who wear a British size 16 (size 12 in the U.S.) say they are happy with their appearance and have high body confidence—nearly twice as many (42%) as those wearing a British size 6 (U.S. Read More
Young people notice. And as they grow, they internalize. But they also reflect and speak out. Lily Myers raises her voice through poetry. The Wesleyan University student was awarded Best Love Poem last April at the College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational (CUPSI) for her spoken word piece, “Shrinking Women.” It’s an on-point expression of the anxieties and pressures women and girls face regarding their self-image and how it’s different from what many (but certainly not all) men and boys experience. Read More
That is the big question that New York City is raising through a new campaign called the NYC Girls Project, which aims to help promote self-esteem in tweens. In the newest “public education campaign geared towards girls ages 7-12,” new ads will appear on buses, subways, and phone kiosks. Read More