Tag » black
While capturing the true beauty of brown skin eluded photographers for nearly a century—it wasn't until the 1970s and '80s that film was reformulated so that its emulsions were sensitive to the nuances of non-white complexions—whoever snapped the photos of these women of color during the 1800s were doing something right. Read More
Pastel locks are a summer staple. Even people living under a rock know this is true. And recently, one of my favorite writers for Refinery29, Gabrielle Korn, recently wrote a piece entitled “What Pastel Hair Means for Women of Color.” As a Latina, my hair has always been subject to approval by family members, friends, and even strangers. And since I often times pass as white, my hair is sometimes the only attribute capable of signaling that I am not white. Because of this, I never thought that pastel hair could be a reality for me. Read More
Maya Peterson of Lawrenceville School was forced to step down as the first female black and Latina student president after some pictures of her mocking ‘typical white classmates’ emerged online. Lawrenceville is the most expensive prep school in the United States. It is located in New Jersey and one year's tuition costs about $35,000. It has some pretty successful alumni, too, including CEOs Michael Eisner and Lewis Bernard, many senators and the founder of Forbes. Read More
Two photographers -- the fashion and fine art-minded Omar Victor Diop and the self-proclaimed cultural-critic, Antoine Tempe -- recently teamed up to create an attention-grabbing photo series. Their angle? Re-casting classic stills from old Hollywood movies with "a representative sample of the cultural scenes in Dakar and Abidjan."  The project was funded by the Onomo International hotel group, and includes images like:    "Breakfast at Onomo's" courtesy of ONOMOllywood.com  And.... "Thelma & Louise," courtesy of ONOMOllywood. Read More
  In a recent documentary, the Image Activist Michaela Angela Davis, the founder of Un’ruly Antonia Opiah, and the model Autumn McHugh join the Miss Black Massachusetts Safiya Songhai and several other black women in a discussion and study of hair. In June, they hosted a public exhibit entitled, “You Can Touch My Hair,” in which women of color held signs inviting passersby to touch their hair. They chose to call it an “exhibition” to confront the way black women in America have been treated and examined by the white majority. Read More