Tag » barbie
  For the artist Annette Thas, Barbie is a disturbingly bittersweet symbol of childhood nostalgia and longing; for installation piece “Wave I,” she uses between 3,000 and 5,000 barbie dolls to build a sculptural wave, re-appropriating the doll as a means of translating her earliest memories, scenes which now flood her after returning to Belgium to care for her ill sister. Read More
  Barbie has made headlines that lately; as we continue to push toy companies towards a doll that includes more diverse body types, ethnicities, careers, and lifestyles, some groundbreaking artists have reworked and re-appropriated the toy to challenge expectations and sexist assumptions. My personal favorite of these artists, Margaux Lange, shared a recent Barbie tidbit with her social media network this morning: the doll is going to be featured in the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue. Read More
  Barbie’s place in adolescence and constructed femininity has baffled psychologists and feminist alike: on one hand, she’s a patient confidante onto which girls might project their hopes and aspirations. But she also espouses limited and damaging views on female roles, bodies, and sexuality. She sends conflicting messages, passively listening to you for hours while remaining inhumanly cold. As girls, we intuitively pick up that Barbie is “grown up” and “sexy,” but she doesn’t have genitals and therefore cannot be understood as a sexual agent. Read More
  As children, many of us turn to our toys to navigate our developing identities. Sometimes, our dolls serve as surrogates; we parent them the way we see our children parenting us, and we identify with them. Photography operates similarly: as teens, we might dog-ear or collect magazine images that appeal to our expanding sense of self. Since so many dolls and photographs in mainstream fashion magazines present a grossly limited definition of femininity, it can be damaging to use them as a means of self-definition. Read More
  From Scary Movie onwards, Anna Faris has brilliantly subverted female lead movie tropes. In the 2011 The New Yorker piece “Funny Like A Guy,” she express her desire to verge from the Type A, likable and romantic roles offered to so many Hollywood starlets. She craves grit and authenticity: “I’d like to explore Type D, the sloppy ones,” she said.    So it makes sense that Faris’s relationship with Barbie, an early image of a stereotyped adult woman, was a little unconventional. Read More
  I must say that after I watched the short documentary “Space Barbie,” I felt very conflicted. I'd heard of Valeria Lukyanova before - a Russian woman living in Odessa, Valeria has used plastic surgery and extreme body modification to become what she calls a “refined girl," and what the rest of the world calls a Barbie doll.     Disturbing, no? I don’t think her impossibly unnatural appearance sends a good message to women, especially to young girls. Read More
You might remember artist Nickolay Lamm for his work removing doll's makeup to show that they looked just as lovely without that extra layer. Now, as promised, he's created a "normal"-sized Barbie, made to show us more realistic proportions of American women. He transferred CDC (Center for Disease Control & Prevention) measurements of an average 19-year-old woman to make the 3-D model, then used photoshop to liken the doll to a Barbie. "If we criticize skinny models, we should at least be open to the possibility that Barbie may negatively influence young girls as well," says Lamm. Read More
Barbie’s iconic pink mansion unfolded in Berlin yesterday, and a local feminist group took a stand against it's arrival. With a rally cry of “Pink Stinks," protesters marched to the dream house– functioning as a half museum, half endless "walk-in closet" - in numbers far exceeding that of regular attendees. Barbie herself was seen pinned to crucifix, and set on fire, burning her into a melting mess. Security guards promptly escorted protesters out of there, and in other words, shit got cray. Read More
Austin, Texas based “lifestyle” photographer Jaime C. Moore is sick of Barbie. And Disney Princesses too. Now before your feathers get all ruffled, let’s talk about why. As the mother of a 5 year-old daughter and a professional photographer, Jaime wanted to take photos of her daughter in new and creative ways that would not only look great on film, but also get her daughter thinking about the kind of woman she can grow up to be. Read More
Photoshop is often used to exaggerate and warp women's bodies into looking unnatural and adhering to impossibly high standards of beauty. Artist Nickolay Lamm and collaborating artist Nikolett Mérész decided to use photoshop to do good instead. After seeing the viral photo of Barbie without makeup by Eddi Aguirre, Lamm wanted to create more realistic versions of the more popular dolls. He deemed the Aguirre version too excessive, stating that it "completely exaggerates. Read More