Tag » art
  For many young feminists, the “selfie” has been claimed as a fulfilling expressive medium that lends itself to self-actualization and confidence. The artist Lindsay Bottos explains, “The act of women taking selfies is inherently feminist, especially in a society that tries so hard to tell women that our bodies are projects to be worked on […] Selfies are like a ‘fuck you’ to all of that. Read More
Intersections is an impossibly ornate installation by artist Anila Quayyum Agha, that uses laser-cut wood to throw whimsical and incredibly detailed patterns onto gallery walls and floors. Agha was born in Pakistan, attended the University of North Texas in and is decorated with many accolades, including the Creative Renewal Fellowship, awarded by the Indianapolis Arts Council. Read More
  The student artists Ayako Kanda and Mayuka Hayashi of Musashino Art University in Japan recently unveiled a gorgeous series of portraits of X-Ray and CT images of embracing couples. One might expect images devoid of flesh, readable facial expressions, and color to read as clinical and sterile, but the photographs are strikingly human: “X-ray images usually show the finite nature of our bodies composed only of matter. But these couples’ portraits reveal a pulse that isn’t normally seen,” the artists explain. Read More
Daniel Seung Lee. Pink Flamingo, #FC74FD   From Brick Red to Blush, the magic of Crayola crayons lies in their color names. While teaching to children a wide array of color, the utensils also teach us some of our first vocabulary words: I learned what a Flamingo was from a crayon! As we grow up, we can lose the sense of wonder brought on by a fresh box of Crayola crayons; unless we live in Pleasantville, the joy the fact of color often escapes us.  Daniel Seung Lee. Read More
  In Flower Woman, the photographer Eunice Adorno enters the Mennonite community Nuevo Ideal, in Durango, and The Onda Zacatecas, hoping to scratch beneath the surfaces of stereotypes and uncover deeper truths about the women’s lifestyles. The character of the strict and austere Mennonite female is replaced with a more honest and nuanced exploration of female friendships and family.     The images are whimsical, displaying the women sporting smiles and floral prints, enjoying an ice cream cone and playing with one another’s hair. Read More
  Barbie’s place in adolescence and constructed femininity has baffled psychologists and feminist alike: on one hand, she’s a patient confidante onto which girls might project their hopes and aspirations. But she also espouses limited and damaging views on female roles, bodies, and sexuality. She sends conflicting messages, passively listening to you for hours while remaining inhumanly cold. As girls, we intuitively pick up that Barbie is “grown up” and “sexy,” but she doesn’t have genitals and therefore cannot be understood as a sexual agent. Read More
  We all know that heavily Photoshopped images don’t accurately depict the human form, yet it’s still easy to become lulled into believing that idealized bodies are relatively uniform. Photographic subjects are too often deemed attractive or not, depending on seemingly arbitrary cultural ideologies. We see fine art and the media portray women as familiar hourglasses; men are often pictured with authoritative stances and broad shoulders. Read More
The performance artist Nate Hill is known for his groundbreaking work on race in contemporary culture, examining the idolization of white women as ideals of beauty and femininity. In one recent project, he sold milk gargled by college-educated white women. In another, he donned white face. His new project “Trophy Scarves” might be his most controversial yet. In an attempt to shed light on the way men in power look at race and women, he invites white women over Craigslist to sit for nude photos posed as scarves draped around his neck. Read More
  My grandmother was an artist, and throughout her career, she’d make abstract sculptures and embroidery that I’d stare at for hours as a child: “oh, that looks like a face, and that there? That’s an animal.” Our play was art-making, and I was always amazed at how different her aesthetic would become when she was with me. Her paper dolls weren’t abstract at all; I’d make an abstract shape, and she’d magically transform it into a dragon. Her work around my childhood self was whimsically cartoonish, otherworldly and yet completely familiar. Read More
  Since “selfie” became Oxford English Dictionary’s word of the year, the internet has been abuzz with mediations on the trend’s implication for young women, the group with whom the trend has become most popular. Does the validation of the selfie as a word and as a fixture in modern society hurt or help those who take them?   Flavorwire’s Michelle Dean and Jezebel’s Erin Gloria Ryan view the photographic medium as dangerous to young women’s self-esteem and sense of worth. Read More