Tag » art
If you search the phrase "Am I pretty or ugly?" on YouTube, you will receive "About 556,000" results. The video stills all feature young girls sitting alone in front of the camera. Descriptions all read along the lines of "Please tell me in comments," "I am so ugly," and "Be truthful please tell me." The thousands and thousands of videos reveal a sort of strange subculture of girls talking about school, boys, and of course, their appearance...to the entire internet.  Artist Louise Orwin is exploring this phenomenon with a new project titled "Pretty Ugly. Read More
Yesterday, at the age of 76, Massachusetts-born photographer Deborah Turbeville passed away after an eight-month struggle with lung cancer. She was listening to Rachmaninoff on her iPod.  Though she was known as a "fashion photographer" she considered herself anything but. “The photographs were for fashion," she once told The Independent. "But at the same time they had an ulterior motive, something more to do with the world in general. Read More
    For those who haven’t heard, Cannes film festival favorite Blue is the Warmest Color has a graphic lesbian sex scene. A sex scene that has been debated, cursed and praised for its real and explicit portrayal of two women being intimate. Apparently, the sex scene is ten minutes long, which is an issue for a lot of people. But what is the issue? The nudity? The lesbianism? I am excited about the queer visibility that this movie promotes although it has been argued that the scene may cheapen that visibility. Read More
Elinor Carucci, "Feeding Emanuelle from a plastic bottle after I stopped breastfeeding" 2004. Photography, as a medium, is inextricably bound to the idea of motherhood. We see mothers (and fathers) everywhere snapping pictures of their infants. Art critic Roland Barthes rooted his discussion of the emotional power of photographs in an image he found of his mother after her death. Photography gives us a means of capturing something we know will soon be lost: the pregnant belly, the milk mustache. Read More
For years, archaeologists have believed the first cave-paintings to be composed predominantly by men. "There has been a male bias in the literature for a long time," says archaeologist Dean Snow. But now, new research has the field thinking it was women who were behind the art all along.  The aforementioned homie Dean Snow recently studied the outlines of handprints found in French and Spanish cave art. By analyzing the lengths of the fingers, Snow concluded that no less than 75% of the handprints found were created by women. Read More