Tag » advertising
  A few weeks back, we were so thrilled to hear that Aerie, the teen lingerie store affiliated with American Eagle, will not be Photoshopping their models for their new Spring campaign titled #AerieREAL. The ad images feature models ranging in size, shape, and ethnicity (this range is vast relative to most competitors, although, to be honest, it still does not encompass the diversity of America’s teens). Read More
  Open letters to children have become a viral sensation this year, capable of permanently cataloguing personal words of wisdom for public inspiration. Yes, there have been some failures, like the letters scolding teens for taking selfies or shaming them wearing certain clothing items. But there have also been those special letters from parent to child, promoting freedoms of self-expression and comfort amidst the pains of growing up. Dr. Kelly Flanagan’s compassionate message to his daughter is one such letter. Read More
  Almost every home product advertisement you can think of features a woman acting out a pretty stereotypical domestic role; you’d think all we spend our time doing was wiping counters and asking our rambunctious husbands and sons to take their shoes off. In the wake of the recent Super Bowl ad frenzy, comes this amazing parody video advertising a product called “Swiffle. Read More
If there are two things I love, it’s animals and Ellen DeGeneres. Since it’s Ellen’s birthday this week, she decided to break the rules a little bit and share her very special Super Bowl commercial ahead of time. Ellen stars as Goldilocks—Ellilocks, if you will—except instead of searching for porridge, she really wants to groove out to the perfect tune on the app Beats Music. Always the animal lover, Ellen ends up having a blast with the bears (and a few of their woodland friends) as they all dance “happily ever after!” Take a look below. Read More
  “What is between my legs is not thoroughly who I am. If gender is black and white, I’m grey,” says Ryley Pogensky, a gender queer model participating in Barney’s New York’s new campaign. Pogensky is one of almost twenty transgender and gender queer models featured in the catalog and ad images, shot by the legendary Bruce Weber.    Each model has a story to tell, hailing from communities across the globe. Culturally, socio-economically, and even professionally—some are not professional models—they compose a richly diverse group. Read More
The photographer Suzanne Heintz is sick and tired of being told that she needs to marry and have kids. Although she acknowledges the strides made by women in the past decades in her interview with Feature Shoot, she feels now that a new sort of feminine mystique has emerged in the past years; rather than being expected to be perfect housewives, society now demands that women have the family, the career, and the flourishing social life. Amidst pressure to “have it all,” Heintz has proudly declared herself a “spinster. Read More
  A recent Pantene ad titled “Labels Against Women” has sparked a feminist debate: is it okay for the company to use feminism to sell products? Some think that the use of feminism in advertising is a great way to appeal to the masses and to sneak difficult ideas on inequality and wage gaps into pop culture; the ad has been touted as a powerful beacon for women in the workplace. Read More
We hear it all the time: sex sells. And it’s true. As the art critic John Berger has suggested, advertisements are effective when they sell a fantasy: buy this product, and you will be envied by all. Women in both art and advertising are often posed for the male gaze; in other words, even if there’s a man in an ad photo, the woman is shown facing the consumer, promising to be just as attainable as the product she sells. Her body is symbolically up-for-grabs to anyone who can afford the wristwatch or cologne she markets. Read More
  The internet is ablaze with fury after the release of an advertisement by ProgressiveNow Colorado and Colorado Consumer Health Initiative for ObamaCare. The ad features a woman beside a man; he holds her around the hips, and she holds a packet of birth control pills. Beneath the image reads, "OMG, he's hot! Let's hope he's as easy to get as this birth control. My health insurance covers the pill, which means all I have to worry about is getting him between the covers."    Critics find the ad “degrading to women. Read More
  Reportage aims to give readers and viewers the impression of being there; we consume news because knowledge of goings on in faraway places grants us the illusion of actually participating in significant events. The most famous photojournalistic images either capture something so momentous or historic that they make us forget that we weren’t actually there when it was taken. The well-known “Kissing Soldier” photo is one such image; although the woman didn’t know the man at all, we’ve constructed a national narrative about a love story that never happened. Read More