Tag » Sundance Film Festival
  Think about the women you know in your life: How many have experienced rape or sexual assault? Since even one isn’t okay, odds are it’s a number way above the realm of acceptable. And that’s just the women whose stories you know. An unusual but welcome creative combination graced the stage this weekend at Sundance Film Festival in the name of solidarity for survivors. Read More
“What Happened, Miss Simone?” has been named as the opening film for the 2015 Sundance Film Festival. The documentary follows the life of artist and activist Nina Simone, and is directed by Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Liz Garbus (The Farm: Angola, USA and Bobby Fischer Against the World). It will air as part of Netflix’s original programming and be available for streaming in 2015. Read More
  From Girls, to Obvious Child, to Transparent, actress Gaby Hoffmann is in everything we want to see.In a world where former-child-star meltdowns are a dime a dozen, a late afternoon lunch in Brooklyn with 32-year-old actress Gaby Hoffmann is a refreshingly chill oasis. Back in the late '80s and early '90s, Hoffmann nabbed some of the choicest kid roles of the era, in films such as Field of Dreams, Uncle Buck and Sleepless in Seattle. But these days, she’s known for taking on much more daring projects. Read More
The Source is a fascinating new interview series designed and executed by celebrated artist Doug Aitken. Aitken artfully presents intimate and revealing interviews that give the audience a new lens through which to view the creative artists we are so familiar seeing, bringing attention to the lesser-seen process of creativity. I first heard about the project at the Sundance Film festival, which is part of the New Frontier program. At Sundance, The installation was constructed inside of a custom built, 2,000-square-feet, circular structure called the Pavilion. Read More
  Since his tragic death, Philip Seymour Hoffman’s image has fluttered on and off of our computer screens more times than we can count. How might we chose a single photograph that captures the weight of artistic talent that influenced and moved our culture? A few short weeks ago, Hoffman sat for the photographer Victoria Will  (a BUST Magazine contributor) at the Sundance film festival, and her photograph might just be that special-- if sorrowful-- one that affords him a sensitive dignity that resonates with fans and friends. Read More
  So many films, so little time! The breadth and scope of this international festival is hard to grasp. I’ve been here for a week seeing 4 to 5 movies a day, and I feel like I just scratched the surface.  As many of these films will be released over the next year, I am here as your guide to point you towards the right theatres to park your butt in. More to come! That said, there is one film that is towering over all the rest. The new film by Richard Linklater, (Slacker, Before Midnight) BOYHOOD is the buzz film here this year. Read More
Until four years ago, physician Dr. George Tiller was the medical director of Women’s Health Care Services in Wichita, Kansas. While in school, Tiller heard of a woman who died from an illegal abortion, and vowed to use his medical skills to prevent such tragedies from happening. In 2009, Dr. Tiller was assassinated in his church, making him the eighth abortion clinic worker to be killed following the Roe V. Wade decision of 1973. Now, in the wake of Tiller’s murder, there are only four physicians remaining in the United States who will openly perform third-trimester abortions. Read More
  Academy Award-winning documentarian Freida Mock’s new film Anita premiered at Sundance on Saturday, January 19. The film revolves around one of the most famous senate hearings of the late twentieth century, in which attorney Anita Hill accused Justice Clarence Thomas of sexual harassment. Over twenty years later, it's easy to forget the controversy of the Thomas  hearings; I was totally unprepared for the gale-force emotions that came from watching them all over again. Read More
It's safe to say that here in the good ol' U.S. of A, we're fortunate enough to be able to choose our own spouses (for the most part). The single woman has become not just a common and accepted archetype, but at times a symbol of power. There are various cultures around the world that still uphold the concept of arranged marriages, the Jewish Haredi community being one of them. Rama Brushtein directs Fill the Void, a telling Israeli drama of the eighteen-year-old Shira Mendelman (Hadas Yaron), daughter of a Rabbi, who is pressured to marry the husband of her dead sister. Read More
Sundance 2013 brought the lady goods in a big way. Fifty percent of the festival's featured films were directed by female directors this year, a stunning leap to full parity for the first time ever at the festival, and a miraculous chasm jumper when compared with the reported disparity in Hollywood (only seven percent of directors registered with the director’s guild are female).  But we’ll come back to that some other day. Read More