Tag » Pakistan
  Inspector Shazadi Gillani and Rizwana Zafar have faced their fair share of hurdles. Without the support of her father, Gillani paid for her own basic training. After the birth of eight daughters, Zafar’s parents raised her as a boy. The two now police an especially conservative northern Khyber Pakhunkhwa province. Gillani dons a burqa, and Zafar wears a faux mustache as they fend off bandits and militant forces.    As Reuters reports, the biggest battle fought by these women is one against inequality. Read More
Everyone has been talking about 16-year-old Malala Yousafzai and her outspoken advocacy of women and education (we certainly have been). Tuesday night, the youngest Nobel Peace Prize nominee went on television to speak on one of America’s greatest and prestigious stages—that’s right, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. And so commenced the first time I’ve wept while watching Comedy Central (aside from whenever I watch 50 First Dates). Read More
We’re happy to report that Pakistani teen activist Malala Yousafzai is not expected to have significant brain damage following an assassination attempt by the Taliban. Malala has been undergoing treatment at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, England for the last two weeks. According to University Hospitals Birmingham medical director Dr. Dave Rosser, is able to walk nearly unassisted and “appears to have very good memories of both the last few days of her care and events prior to the incident. Read More
  Malala Yousafzai, the brave young activist from Pakistan who was shot by the Taliban, is doing well. She’s currently recovering at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, England.  Dr. David Rosser, the medical director at the hospital, stated that Malala is communicating freely and writing, and said that Malala wanted information about her condition to be made public. She can’t currently speak due to a tracheotomy tube, but should be able to within the next few days. Malala will need surgery to restructure her skull and Dr. Read More
The recent shooting of Malala Yousafzai has torn me up. Deeply. You’d have to be an automaton to feel anything but grief. But she continues to hang on, and along with the rest of the world, I'm hoping that her doctors' most recent predictions--that she'll make a "decent recovery"--will turn out to be true.     I mourn the disruption, if not the destruction, of a young and very promising life. But violence is often a response to fear, and it gives me hope—real, fierce hope—that the Taliban is so terrified of a teenage girl. They should be. Read More