Tag » PBS
When I grow up, I want to be Estelle Craig.   Estelle “Stella” Craig is 95 and one of the most fascinating women I’ve come across in a long time. She is the subject of a documentary aptly titled STELLA IS 95, directed by her daughter, Robin Baker Leacock. The film follows her around in her daily activities in her Toronto retirement community and allows her to candidly talk about her life as an event planner, writer, and community leader. Read More
It's no secret that awful things are happening to women around the globe simply because they're female: child marriage and sex slavery are just a few that come to mind. Thankfully, some people are working to put an end to these atrocities. Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn highlight this excellent work in their powerful two-part documentary Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide. The Half the Sky project began with a critically-acclaimed book, and now includes websites, music, and a social media campaign. Read More
Hearing about the horrific violence and political turmoil in Syria has greatly saddened me, as well as raised questions about the background of the country. How, I wonder, has day-to-day life been for Syrians, and particularly for Syrian women, while being ruled by an oppressive military regime for the past 40 years?     The beautiful documentary “The Light In Her Eyes” opens a window into the changing roles of girls, women, and Islam in Syria. These subjects are illuminated by the story of school for girls to study the Qur’an. Read More
I have a big popcorn bowl ready for a History Detectives segment on Tuesday, September 20th (PBS, 8-9 ET). This episode, which focuses on women's suffrage, is worth watching because it’s rare that women’s history gets much play on national TV.  The History Detectives program on September 20th features Yvonne Blemly Crumlish and probes the mystery of her grandmother Addie's suffrage pennant that Yvonne's father gave her 30 years ago. Read More
  "One person alone cannot push an elephant." Tune in to PBS tonight at 10 pm for the broadcast premiere of "Pushing the Elephant," a powerful new documentary about Rose Mapendo, a Congolese Tutsi, a mother of ten, a victim of genocidal violence and an activist for peace and reconciliation.   Ten years ago, Rose Mapendo, her husband, and her children were arrested by the Congolese government and held in a death camp, as the ethnic conflict that ravaged Rwanda spilled over into the Democratic Republic of Congo. Read More
The good news is Tina Fey was the youngest person and the third woman ever to receive the Mark Twain Prize for Humor last week, and great comedians like Steve Martin, Amy Poehler, Betty White, and Tracy Morgan had plenty of great things to say about her. The bad news is PBS is lame, and they cut a part of her acceptance speech where she talked about Sarah Palin and the politics of conservative women. The unedited speech leaked, however, and went viral, exposing what the network deemed worthy of censoring editing. Read More
 I didn’t discover the great filmmaker Agnès Varda; she discovered me, staring at the posters in the window of her editing suite on the Rue Daguerre in Paris. A tiny, quizzical old lady, she approached, smiling and asked, “Have you discovered something interesting?”  Indeed I had! “La Varda” is one of the brilliant filmmakers to have emerged from the French “nouvelle vague. Read More