Tag » New York Times
  Back in the day, all men were referred to as Mr. (as in Mr. Burns), and women were either Mrs. (as in Mrs. Robinson) or Miss (Miss Hannigan), depending on whether they were married or not.  Actually, if you were a Mrs., you were really supposed to be addressed with either your husband's full name (as in "Mrs. James Franco") or just his last name ("Mrs. Franco") rather than your actual full name (Mrs. Michelle Obama would have been a no-no). Miss ... Read More
The premise of the New York Times’s recent piece on the stay-at-home husbands of female Wall Street execs was a must-click the minute I heard about it: the so-called “house husband” is one of my favorite answers to the nebulous question of how to Have It All. The article focuses on a growing class of families in wealthy suburban areas that are putting aside the traditional nuclear family structure for a more progressive and profitable ... Read More
  On Wednesday evening, The New York Times’s Frank Bruni was enjoying a cab ride home from dinner at New York’s Barbuto when he saw an inconspicuous little iPhone sitting on the seat beside him. Without a case and yet perfectly intact, he took the lost phone home and waited for it to ring. To his dismay, the phone was impenetrable. But there was a stream of texts coming in from celebrity contacts like psychic Peri Lyons and stylist Lo’renzo ... Read More
In The New York Times’ recent Social Q’s, a New York City mom wrote in about a dilemma facing her daughter and a birthday party. Her daughter was invited to a five-year-old’s superhero themed birthday party, but then she was un-invited. Instead, she was invited to a separate birthday party, which is just for girls. Here’s the question below: We received a "save the date" card for a fifth birthday party for a boy my daughter knows. It was to ... Read More
Amanda Filipacchi is an American feminist and novelist who has published three books. Her writing has been praised for its wit and humor, and Love Creeps made The Village Voice's top 25 books of the year in 2005. Imagine Filipacchi's surprise when she noticed that Wikipedia's "List of American novelists" page was slowly moving women into their own separate category, titled "American women novelists." The author read a note at the top of the article that explained ... Read More
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