Tag » Music
Katy Goodman premiered on the indie music scene with her band Vivian Girls in 2007, and before long we were listening to her from our dorm room radios and relying on her for all our angsty-feminist-dream core desires. Formerly known as "Kickball Katy," she's a pro at blending her riot girl sensibilities with melodic, romantic vocals. Her music is wonderfully poppy and elegant, while also comfortably dark and stormy. Since Vivian Girls, Katy has made musical magic with some really cool people (including Cat Power's bassist, Gregg Foreman). Read More
Our Icelandic queen, Björk, is back at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in NYC for her very own retrospective! I had the opportunity to check it out the other day, and honestly, I had no idea what to expect. I was handed an audio guide with headphones and there was a vibrant buzz around the MoMA as I followed the bright pink wall toward the Björk Songlist exhibit. After a brief introduction, I stepped into the first space of the exhibit and was delighted by the sounds of Bjork's music. Read More
It seems wrong to say that any of these lady bands are out to pay tribute to anyone; they rock so hard on their own. But bands like Lez Zeppelin and Vag Halen are doing so much more than covering old faves—they’re out to take on the male dominated world of rock and roll, one metal band at a time. Lez Zeppelin  Founded in 2004 by lead guitarist Steph Paynes, Lez Zeppelin thinks of themselves as a “she-incarnation” rather than a tribute band. Read More
  Put every collaborating musician from super producer Emile Haynie’s We Fall into one room, and it would be music’s version of 2015’s “SNL 40” special. At first glance, the list of guest appearances in the Saturday Night Live special seemed ridiculous, hyperbolic. However, while there were some brief moments of brilliance, the immense pool of talent was ultimately diluted into a flavorless mess. Much like “SNL 40,” We Fall features too many voices, leaving Emile Haynie’s debut album lacking a cohesive narrative. Read More
  Put every collaborating musician from super producer Emile Haynie’s We Fall into one room, and it would be music’s version of 2015’s “SNL 40” special. At first glance, the list of guest appearances in the Saturday Night Live special seemed ridiculous, hyperbolic. However, while there were some brief moments of brilliance, the immense pool of talent was ultimately diluted into a flavorless mess. Much like “SNL 40,” We Fall features too many voices, leaving Emile Haynie’s debut album lacking a cohesive narrative. Read More