Tag » Feminizzle

The Name Game

BY Libby Zay in General

What's in a name?  Apparently, a lot more people get heated up about the issue than you might think.  Although far from a new debate, a recent study reports that 71% of Americans think women should take their spouses name after marriage.  Half of the respondents said the act should be a legal requirement. Read More
How did you first discover feminism?  My story starts as a Midwestern teen with a burgeoning love for punk rock and unlimited access to the internet.  Naturally, it was just a matter of time before I bellied up to my conservative family's dinner table wearing a ''revolution grrrl style now'' tee.   Although I embraced feminism at an early age, for a lot of women--young and old--the f-word is nothing but a curse.  That's why when I stumbled upon a new blog aimed at young feminists, the F Bomb, I knew I had to put in a good word for its creator, Julie Zeilinger. Read More
Okay, I have a confession to make: I love postcards.  But who doesn't?  Nothing fills my heart with honest-to-goodness sentimentality like a 4x6 piece of flimsy cardboard sent from a friend in a faraway place.  That's why when I saw an exhibit dedicated solely to postcards featuring ''bathing beauties'' of the 20th Century is opening, I instantly knew it would be a gush-worthy spread of feminist nostalgia. Read More
 There is a unique movement happening in Iran right now; some have preemptively labeled it a 'revolution,' while others have said it's all U.S.A.-backed smoke and mirrors, but should anyone reject this as anything less than an uprising, they would have to be in denial. So often in traditional media outlets, we see women in Iran and throughout other Muslim-majority countries portrayed as oppressed homemakers, washing clothes by hand outdoors, pulling tightly at their hijabs (head coverings) or burkas. Read More
So Amnesty International has this new interactive billboard . When you look right at it it shows a picture of a happy, smiling couple. As you look away the picture changes to one of domestic violence. The poster has an eye tracking camera in it to know when someone is looking directly at it. The point is to raise awareness of how domestic violence is often behind closed doors, when no one is looking. A couple could seem happy and perfect to the outside world but have a dark and violent problem when they are alone. This is obviously a very state of the art campaign. Read More
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