Tag » Everyday Sexism
  The Australian's bizarre obituary of bestselling novelist Colleen McCullough has received international attention for its sexist second sentence: "Plain of feature and certainly overweight, she was, nevertheless, a woman of wit and warmth."  McCullough's The Thorn Birds sold over 30 million copies worldwide, making her the most successful author in Australian literature.  So for your pleasure I have written a few other obituaries in the style of The Australian.    JRR Tolkien London, Sept. Read More
New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand is accomplished, hard-working, and handles the idiocy she faces constantly with a grace that is unparalleled. She’s done so much to try and better our nation, and that is why we should care about her. Why, then, is “weight loss” the first suggestion that comes up when you type her name into Google?   In an excerpt from her upcoming memoir, Gillibrand goes into detail about the kind of sexist nonsense she faces on a regular basis. Read More
Everyday sexism strikes again. On the Today show last week, Matt Lauer hosted an exclusive interview with General Motors CEO, Mary Barra.   The interview mainly covered the controversy over the late ignition switch recall, and if the interview stopped after those three minutes, it would have been great; however, Lauer asked two more questions that, by God, were so stereotypically sexist that I could not believe someone had not stopped him from going forward with them.  In the video above, Lauer asks the following two questions: 1. Read More
For your consideration: "The Domestic Anti Nag Gag," a soccer ball-shaped device that promises to silence women and allow men to live their lives free of pesky female requests. The English branch of international clothing store River Island recently came under fire for selling this shockingly inappropriate item. Consumers were outraged when they saw the gag pop up on the brand’s website; among those offended was actor Jenny Bede, who promptly shared her thoughts with thousands of Twitter followers: “This can’t be real surely?! It’s disgusting. Read More
Everyday, countless women are catcalled, harassed, and berated based solely on our gender. In a world where people shrug off sexism and claim that the feminist movement is no longer relevant, it helps to have a reminder like Everyday Sexism, a website devoted to chronicling submitted real-life experiences of girls and women. Read More
  I resent the fact that people make assumptions about women based on their tattoos. It’s a part of their body, yet it's still socially acceptable to criticize and judge. Being a woman with tattoos (on the arm, hip, and foot), I find it most frustrating when men find the need to comment on my ink - just as I would find it equally frustrating if they were to make a comment about my legs or something else attached to my body. Apparently a lot of men think tattoos equate a woman with being easy. Read More
  This is gross on way too many levels. The German supermarket chain Esko is selling gendered sausages. WHAT DOES THAT EVEN MEAN. Apparently the men’s sausages are made to be "hearty” and “strongly-spiced," while the lady meat is "lean," with “high-quality vegetables” and a “delicate sheep casing.” They’re versions of the same company’s product, yet they have different ingredients, different prices, and very different packaging. Read More
  It all started with a vagina. Earlier this spring, a Facebook support group directed towards moms posted a picture of an anatomically correct vulva. The group boasted a readership of around 22,000, and the image was clearly meant for education, empowerment, and advocacy. It fell in line with the other discussion topics on Motherwise – which writes about “breastfeeding, parenting issues, and birthing options,” as well as serving as a platform for discourse and community. Within three hours, the picture was taken down. Read More
Now’s your chance to share your stories of chauvinism: Laura Bates' Everyday Sexism Project hopes to “catalogue instances of sexism experienced by women on a day-to-day basis. They might be serious or minor, outrageously offensive or so niggling and normalized that you don’t even feel able to protest. Say as much or as little as you like, use your real name or a pseudonym – it’s up to you.” Here are some examples of the kinds of posts you may see. Everyday Sexism encourages women to let out their experiences with misogyny. Read More