Tag » CHINA
  Flight attendant jobs have a history of being empowering to young women; in the 1960s, girls took jobs as an alternative to marriage and got the chance to save money and travel the world. In the last few decades, that trend has faded in the US, and that’s not a bad thing; women now have more opportunities to pursue other jobs, and women who do choose to be flight attendants don’t have to wear sexy little outfits to work. Read More
Warning: Keep preparatory tissues at hand. This one is a tear-jerker.   On August 30th, a newborn elephant at the Shendiaoshan Wild Animal Nature Reserve in China was repeatedly stomped on by his mother. The zookeepers initially felt that this had to be an accident, and removed Zhuangzhuang (the baby elephant's proper name) from the area to tend to his wounds. However, upon returning Zhuanghzhuang to his habitat, the mother began her stomping again. The zookeepers separated the two once more in order to further assess the situation. Read More
While some Chinese women like property tycoon, Zhang Xin, are huge financial successes, many Chinese women are still undervalued and under threat, as CNN reports. According to Tsinghua University scholar Leta Hong Fincher, there has been a sudden emergence of the phrase, “leftover women.” The derogatory phrase normally refers to spoiled food, but in this case, it’s used for educated women who are still single over the age of 27. It’s repulsive and horribly degrading to have scholarly women cast out for the fact that they’re neither married nor partnered. Read More
Today in awkward slut-shamey advice, Beijing officials are telling women to shield themselves with newspapers in order to avoid sexual harassment.  The cops gave out this hot tip now because of China’s rising summer temperatures – they know that logically, people will be wearing fewer layers and shorter clothes to beat the heat. And police brains often seem to think that shorter clothes = more harassment = under a woman’s control, so lo and behold; it’s yet another case of body-policing police. Read More
In the U.S., the bride and her parents are expected to pay for the wedding, the gown, and to be in charge of the wedding arrangements.  However, in China it is the opposite. Instead, grooms are expected to pay a “bride price” – ordinarily $10,000 – often alongside purchasing an apartment and a car.  A more traditional and old-fashioned practice, these wedding standards are taking over China and redefining marital practices, affecting both Chinese men and women. Read More