And we think the SAT and ACT are hard.  They have nothing on China’s Gaokao exam.  Also known as the National Higher Education Entrance Examination (NCEE), the Gaokao is the sole determinant in university admission in China.  Approximately 9 million students take this test every June over the course of three days on subjects including Chinese, Mathematics, English, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences.  As Los Angeles Times journalist Barbara Demick states, the Gaokao exam “is to the SATs somewhat like a triathlon is to a relay race. Read More
Tired of fielding questions about your enduring singleness from prying family members? Why not rent a significant other for your next family gathering, and nip those harping questions in the bud! This tactic, which might at first sound like something out of a romantic comedy, has become a viable option for women in China. Scouring the classified ads in China will yield postings for proffered male companionship...for the right price. Read More
  China’s next supermodel may just be 72-year-old Liu Xianping.  He’s got the bod for the latest in miniskirts and the legs to pull them off. His cross-dressing photos have gone viral and as a result, his granddaughters’ fashion store sales have increased five fold.      Apparently, Liu has plenty of input on his outfits and enjoys dressing up in contrasting colors. Read More
In “What Century is this Again?” news, a TIME.com article said today that Hong Kong tycoon has offered nearly $65 million to any man willing to marry his daughter. This is no simple (though outdated) case of a father offering a dowry for his daughter. Cecil Chao Sze-tsung’s daughter Gigi is already married...to her longtime girlfriend, Sean Yeung.   Hong Kong does not recognize same-sex unions, so Gigi married Yeung in Paris in April. Read More
Global Times has spotlighted some awesome feminists in China who have recently staged various grassroots protests that go beyond writing articles or giving speeches.  They focus on pressing women’s issues like sexual harassment and workplace and financial inequality.  China is a more difficult environment to protest in, as feminism is less accepted there than in the United States (and a lot of people in the U.S. aren’t down with feminism either). Read More