Masked under hair and everyday objects, is Mitsuko Nagone. But Nagone isn’t just playing hide-and-seek for fun (although it might appear that way). Her self-portrait series, “I Am More Than My Face,” seeks to underscore the dysmorphia of the media generating our identities. 

"With this project, I intend to create myself, instead of finding my identity," Nagone states. "People often ask themselves, 'Who am I?' However...the definition of who they are could limit their own possibilities and the infinity of their essences. I believe that the self should be created, instead of being found. The self-portraits explore this idea since the face is obscured."

Each of her images take on a different suburban housewife cliché: cooking breakfast, doing laundry, tidying up the house--and although Nagone may be Japanese, these are ideas that transcend all cultures. In each of her photos, Nagone is frozen in movement, and we as viewers almost feel intrusive as we watch her home life consume her body.

Images Courtesy of Misuko Nagone Photography

Tagged in: suburbs, self-portraits, Photography, misuko nagone, Japanese, indentity, body dysmorphia   

The opinions expressed on the BUST blog are those of the authors themselves and do not necessarily reflect the position of BUST Magazine or its staff.


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